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16 - The Inclusionary Turn and Its Political Limitations

from Part IV - Inclusion, Populism, and Democracy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 January 2021

Diana Kapiszewski
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
Steven Levitsky
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Deborah J. Yashar
Affiliation:
Princeton University, New Jersey
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Summary

Although Latin America’s inclusionary turn produced tangible benefits for lower-income citizens, these benefits remained partial and politically contingent. The new inclusion extended recognition, access, and resources to social sectors left behind or excluded from the historical process of labor incorporation, but it was noted more for its breadth than its depth, for pluralist as opposed to corporatist modes of interest representation, and for organizational diffuseness rather than density. These traits help explain why the new inclusionary turn was associated with an “easy stage” of redistributive politics in which politically innocuous, low-cost cash transfers could be made to large numbers of weakly or non-organized popular constituencies. They also help explain why the region struggled to advance toward a “higher stage” of redistributive politics requiring more expensive and politically contentious investments in public services and institutional reforms

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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