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Chapter 8 - Do vitamins and natural supplements improve pregnancy rates?

from Section 1 - Patient selection and preparation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2011

Gab Kovacs
Affiliation:
Monash University, Victoria
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Summary

Maternal vitamin, mineral or natural therapy supplementation prior to assisted reproductive technology (ART) may potentially improve ART outcomes and pregnancy rates. Folic acid supplementation pre and during pregnancy is recommended for reducing neural tube defects (NTD), but there is limited evidence as to additional perinatal or obstetric benefits. Additional micronutrients having sufficient evidence to warrant supplementation pre or during pregnancy includes iodine. Other micronutrients of importance to ensure adequate nutrition include vitamin D because of its role in calcium absorption, and the association between maternal and child vitamin D deficiency and poor fetal and infant skeletal growth and mineralization and rickets. Some recent updates suggest that multivitamin supplement can confer an additional benefit to the folate supplements. There is emerging evidence on the positive effects of ensuring adequate micronutrient intake for males before pregnancy to optimize reproductive health.
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How to Improve your ART Success Rates
An Evidence-Based Review of Adjuncts to IVF
, pp. 38 - 42
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

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