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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2023

Malcolm Schofield
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University of Cambridge
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How Plato Writes
Perspectives and Problems
, pp. 290 - 304
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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  • References
  • Malcolm Schofield, University of Cambridge
  • Book: How Plato Writes
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  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108672603.017
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