Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-dpvgk Total loading time: 0.82 Render date: 2022-06-27T19:24:35.862Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Chapter 15 - Italy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2021

Andrew Bednarski
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Aidan Dodson
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
Salima Ikram
Affiliation:
American University in Cairo
Get access

Summary

In January 1831, the Parisian printer Firmin Didot published a Manifesto announcing the imminent publication of the Egyptian and Nubian monuments by Jean-François Champollion and Ippolito Rosellini, based on the notes and images made during the 1828–29 Franco-Tuscan expedition (see p. 22). It contained a description of the work, equally divided between the French and the Italians, to be organised in three parts, to include albums of plates and volumes of texts in French and Italian, and to be issued in a series of fascicles. The death of Champollion in 1832, and subsequent conflicts between his brother Champollion-Figeac and Rosellini, stymied the joint project. Rosellini thus published his Monumenti dell’Egitto e della Nubia alone, in the face of many financial and interpersonal problems, between 1832 and his untimely death in 1843. The ninth and last volume of text and the third and last volume of plates, already prepared by the author, were posthumously published in 1844. This monumental work, presenting an extraordinary quantity of textual, archaeological and visual material, has been fundamental for the development of Egyptology in the Italian peninsula. Almost all the important Italian libraries subscribed to its fascicles, as attested by letters that Rosellini himself wrote to librarians and scholars all over Italy, asking them to sign the subscription Manifesto or informing them about the plans for the publication.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×