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Chapter 26 - Rubella, Measles, Mumps, Varicella, and Parvovirus in Pregnancy (Content last reviewed: 11th November 2020)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 November 2017

David James
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham
Philip Steer
Affiliation:
Imperial College London
Carl Weiner
Affiliation:
University of Kansas
Bernard Gonik
Affiliation:
Wayne State University, Detroit
Stephen Robson
Affiliation:
University of Newcastle
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Summary

Rubella (German measles or “third disease”) is an exanthematous disease caused by a single-stranded RNA virus of the togavirus family.

Type
Chapter
Information
High-Risk Pregnancy
Management Options
, pp. 644 - 658
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
First published in: 2017

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References

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Enders, M, Weidner, A, Rosenthal, T, et al. Improved diagnosis of gestational parvovirus B19 infection at the time of nonimmune fetal hydrops. J Infect Dis 2008; 197: 5862.
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