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Chapter 29 - Other Infectious Conditions in Pregnancy (Content last reviewed: 11th November 2020)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 November 2017

David James
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham
Philip Steer
Affiliation:
Imperial College London
Carl Weiner
Affiliation:
University of Kansas
Bernard Gonik
Affiliation:
Wayne State University, Detroit
Stephen Robson
Affiliation:
University of Newcastle
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Summary

Infections are an important contributor to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality rates. The relative immunosuppression that occurs during pregnancy may alter the natural course of many infectious diseases. Higher attack rates for a variety of bacterial and viral infections are seen in pregnancy. Furthermore, many of these infections may be associated with adverse outcomes, including preterm labor and delivery, low birth weight, and stillbirth. This chapter addresses a large group of infectious diseases and conditions not discussed in other chapters, including streptococcal infections, listeriosis, common sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and vaginitis.

Type
Chapter
Information
High-Risk Pregnancy
Management Options
, pp. 728 - 778
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
First published in: 2017

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