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1 - Ivo of Chartres (Yves de Chartres)

(c. 1040–1115)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 May 2019

Olivier Descamps
Affiliation:
Pantheon-Assas University, Paris
Rafael Domingo
Affiliation:
Emory University, Atlanta
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Summary

Ivo of Chartres (d. 1115) was a central figure in the secular and ecclesiastical affairs of his time, and his wide-ranging works mark an important stage in the development of canon law as a separate discipline. The numerous cases he decided as a judge or commented upon in his extensive correspondence, the canon-law collection he compiled, and the elaborate preface he wrote as an introduction to this collection provide detailed insight into how Ivo understood canonical tradition on diverse questions ranging from the Eucharist to royal marriages, from penitential theology to procedural law. An issue he returned to frequently was how ecclesiastical law in many cases was so diverse that it ultimately was left to the discretion of the judge which traditions to follow and how to interpret the law. Just as canonical tradition often included precedent both for harsh judgment and more lenient attitude, the judge had to decide in every single case whether to apply the rigor of the law or to soften it. The right choice, Ivo taught, would depend on the individual circumstances of the case but should always be guided by the spirit of charity.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Primary Sources

Ivo of Chartres, , “Prologue.” In Prefaces to Canon Law Books in Latin Christianity: Selected Translations, 500–1245, edited by Somerville, Robert and Brasington, Bruce Clark, 121–65. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1998.Google Scholar

Secondary Sources

Brasington, Bruce Clark. Ways of Mercy. The Prologue of Ivo of Chartres: Edition and Analysis. Münster: Lit, 2004.Google Scholar
Brasington, Bruce Clark. “Require in Prologo: The Decretists and Ivo of Chartres’ Prologue.” Zeitschrift der Savigny-Stiftung für Rechtsgeschichte, kanonistische Abteilung 87 (2001): 84124.Google Scholar
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Brett, Martin. “Creeping up on the Panormia.” In Grundlagen des Rechts. Festschrift für Peter Landau, edited by Helmholz, Richard H., Mikat, Paul, Müller, Jörg, and Stolleis, Michael, 205–70. Paderborn: Schöningh, 2000.Google Scholar
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Brett, Martin. “Urban II and the Collections Attributed to Ivo of Chartres.” In Proceedings of the Eighth International Congress of Medieval Canon Law: San Diego, University of California at La Jolla, 21–27 August 1988, edited by Chodorow, Stanley, 2746. Vatican City: Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, 1992.Google Scholar
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Rolker, Christof. Canon Law and the Letters of Ivo of Chartres. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
Rolker, Christof. “The Earliest Work of Ivo of Chartres: The Case of Ivo’s Eucharist Florilegium and the Canon Law Collections Attributed to Him.Zeitschrift der Savigny-Stiftung für Rechtsgeschichte, kanonistische Abteilung 124 (2007): 109–27.Google Scholar
Rolker, Christof. “History and Canon Law in the Collectio Britannica: A New Date for London, BL Add. 8873.” In Bishops, Texts and the Use of Canon Law around 1100: Essays in the Honour of Martin Brett, edited by Brasington, Bruce Clark and Cushing, Kathleen Grace, 141–52. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008.Google Scholar

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