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6 - Charles Dumoulin

(1500–1566)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 May 2019

Olivier Descamps
Affiliation:
Pantheon-Assas University, Paris
Rafael Domingo
Affiliation:
Emory University, Atlanta
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Summary

Charles Dumoulin (1500–1566) is one of the most famous jurists of early modern Europe. His Commentary on the Custom of Parisearned him a reputation as a brilliant jurist and as a founder of a unified French legal culture. Until the early twentieth century, French jurists considered engagement with Dumoulin’s work obligatory for a better understanding of the sources of Napoleon’s Civil Code. Yet Dumoulin was also a man of his age, torn by the growing divisions within Christianity and fascinated by the rise of nationalist interests. His hostility towards the pope and his condemnation of abusive practices within the Roman Catholic Church led to his becoming persona non gratain Paris, and he was forced into exile in Switzerland and Germany, where he met Calvinist and Lutheran theologians without ever losing his uncompromising temper and sense for individual autonomy. Dumoulin struggled to find a personal faith adapted both to his spiritual needs and to his concerns with the privileges of the Gallican Church and the French monarchy. The chapter highlights the impact of his Protestant sympathies on his ecclesiological and economic thought, particularly his call for a return to the primitive church and acceptance of moderate interest rates as a matter of principle.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Recommended Reading

Carbonnier, Jean. “Du Moulin à Tubingue.” Revue générale du droit, de la législation et de la jurisprudence en France et à l’étranger 40 (1936): 194209.Google Scholar
Cazals, Géraldine. “Molinaeus noster. Charles Du Moulin (1500–1566), prince des juristes, praticien engagé et fondateur de l’école juridique française. Un modèle de jurisconsulte dans la France du XIXe siècle.” In Mélanges en l’honneur de Jean-Louis Thireau, edited by Dobigny-Reverso, Anne, Prévost, Xavier, and Warembourg, Nicolas. Paris: Mare & Martin, 2019, forthcoming.Google Scholar
Filhol, René. “Dumoulin, Charles.” In Dictionnaire de droit canonique, edited by Naz, Raoul, vol. 5, cols. 4167. Paris: Letouzey et Ané, 1953.Google Scholar
Gebauer, Martin. “Charles Dumoulin zum 450. Todestag.” Zeitschrift für europäisches Privatrecht 24 (2016): 928–49.Google Scholar
Kelley, Donald R.Fides historiae: Charles Dumoulin and the Gallican View of History.” Traditio 22 (1966): 347402.Google Scholar
Kim, Marie Seong-Hak. “Charles Dumoulin, Commentarii in consuetudines Parisienses.” In The Formation and Transmission of Western Legal Culture: 150 Books that Made the Law in the Age of Printing, edited by Dauchy, Serge, et al., 8285. Cham: Springer, 2016.Google Scholar
Savelli, Rodolfo. “Diritto romano e teologia reformata. Du Moulin di fronte al problema dell’interesse del denaro.” Materiali per una storia della cultura giuridica 23 (1993): 291324.Google Scholar
Thireau, Jean-Louis. Charles Du Moulin (1500–1566). Étude sur les sources, la méthode, les idées politiques et économiques d’un juriste de la Renaissance. Genève: Droz, 1980.Google Scholar

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