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Chapter 16 - Sexing and Gendering the Succession Myth in Hesiod and the Ancient Near East

from Part III - Difference

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2021

Adrian Kelly
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Christopher Metcalf
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
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Summary

This chapter considers the case of the Song of Emergence that has proved central to several contributions collected here, but approaches the comparison as an opportunity to appreciate the distinctive differences reflected in the various relevant sources. This chapter emphasises the role of female wife–mother figures as destabilising elements in Hesiod’s Theogony, in contrast to the more limited roles of female characters particularly in the Song of Emergence, and locates that gendering theme within the wider context of early Greek mythology. This comparison allows us to see the individual element working within its own context, to determine what is distinctive about each tradition and so, finally, to understand all of them better. Genealogy, at least in the way most Classicists would like to practise it, is neither possible nor profitable. But the comparison remains, and its analogy can tell us a lot.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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