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Chapter Six - Le Pro Bono: The Development of Legal Volunteerism in Europe

from Part Two - Europe

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 May 2022

Scott L. Cummings
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles
Fabio de Sa e Silva
Affiliation:
University of Oklahoma, Norman
Louise G. Trubek
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Madison
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Summary

At an international conference on access to justice hosted by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York in 2000, Jean-Luc Bedos, a partner in the Paris office of Dentons and a founder of the nongovernmental organization (NGO) Droits D’Urgence, stated point blank: “Pro bono does not exist in France.” In the same presentation, Bedos mentioned that four hundred volunteer lawyers were working with his NGO to provide legal assistance to “sans-papiers” immigrants, obviously seeing no contradiction between the two statements. About a dozen years later, PILnet: The Global Network for Public Interest Law would honor Bedos and two other French lawyers for their pioneering work in building pro bono culture in Europe, and Bedos now serves on the board of directors of PILnet, which has become the leading promoter of pro bono practice in Europe.

Type
Chapter
Information
Global Pro Bono
Causes, Context, and Contestation
, pp. 215 - 268
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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