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8 - Using Genetic Etiology to Intervene with Students with Intellectual Disabilities

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 October 2017

Susan Bouregy
Affiliation:
Yale University, Connecticut
Elena L. Grigorenko
Affiliation:
Yale University, Connecticut
Stephen R. Latham
Affiliation:
Yale University, Connecticut
Mei Tan
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Houston
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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