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6 - Security Vulnerabilities, Backdoors, Exploits and the Marketplace for Each: The Return of Boba Fett – Bug Bounty Hunter in the New Republic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 September 2020

Lilian Edwards
Affiliation:
Newcastle Law School, Newcastle University
Schafer Burkhard
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Edina Harbinja
Affiliation:
Aston Law School, Aston University
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Summary

Unbeknownst to his arch-enemy Hans Solo, Boba Fett survived from the jaws of the Sarlacc in the Galactic Republic. Boba was the most feared bounty hunter in the Galaxy, and one of the most popular characters in the entire Star Wars universe. He remains determined to take down Hans Solo. Having incurred multiple irreversible wounds from the jaws of the Sarlacc, Boba took five years to make a partial recovery. While his upper torso was kept intact, he remains paralysed from the waist down. He has had three failed cyborg surgeries to connect his body with robotic limbs. He has vowed to take revenge and has been silently plotting to take Hans Solo and the Republic Army down. He is not his former physical self. His superior warrior and fighting skills are no more. He must find a new way to revenge against Hans Solo and to survive economically in his new surroundings on the expensive planet Norbiac.

Determined to succeed, Boba has been studying night and day for the past five years learning how to hack into network systems. Much to his surprise, Boba is a natural. As someone who is incapable of anything but full mastery of a discipline, he knows that to succeed he will have to study the art of war, cryptography, security vulnerabilities and exploits. He begins by starting with a chapter in the book Future Technologies from the planet Earth, published in 2018. He chuckles at the thought of what measly humans with known inferior knowledge would have thought of as futuristic in the year 2018. But he knows that in order to succeed at his revenge, he will need to understand humans and how their marketplace for bug bounties and security vulnerabilities started. Earth is still the planet where corporations pay the most amount of money for zero-day exploits, vulnerabilities and bug bounties. He begins with a chapter by Alana Maurushat and Rob Hamper, ‘Security Vulnerabilities, Backdoors, Exploits and the Marketplace for Each’.

Apple v FBI made waves in the media with panels sprouting globally to address this novel tension between technologies designed to protect privacy and security, and law enforcement's desire and need to break them to access data. The problem with this characterisation is that it is not novel.

Type
Chapter
Information
Future Law
Emerging Technology, Regulation and Ethics
, pp. 149 - 178
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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