Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-gq7q9 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-20T13:17:16.919Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

2 - Privacy and Identity through the Eyes of Disney Princesses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 September 2020

Lilian Edwards
Affiliation:
Newcastle Law School, Newcastle University
Schafer Burkhard
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Edina Harbinja
Affiliation:
Aston Law School, Aston University
Get access

Summary

Once Upon a Time …

Once upon a time there were eleven beautiful princesses. In many ways they were very different: they came from all over the world, from different periods of history, some from fiction, some from fact, some from fairy tale or folklore, some whose stories were shaped in the modern era. Though the films they grace were created in many different times and for widely different audiences, the stories of each of these fair princesses have distinct similarities, and not simply because the protagonists are all beautiful, troubled and beset by powerful enemies. Each highlights a key issue or issues about privacy and identity that are as relevant to today's online world as they were in the princesses’ own realms and eras.

That they do so is neither happenstance nor some carefully crafted plan of Disney. Rather, it reflects something more important: privacy is a perennial issue, not a modern or transient indulgence as is sometimes suggested, an idea that did not exist in the past and will not exist in the future. That all these tales demonstrate the importance of privacy and identity rights is thus something that should be taken seriously – as should the rights themselves, which are also, at times, in danger of being dismissed as unimportant, outdated or even self-indulgent in the face of other, seemingly more grown-up issues such as security or economic prosperity.

The earliest of the princesses, Snow White, appeared in Disney's first full-length animation, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, in 1937, but it wasn't until 2000 that ‘Disney Princesses’ became an official franchise. At that point there were nine ‘official’ Disney Princesses – as of July 2018 there were eleven, with a number of other unofficial princesses lurking around the edges. The franchise has an official website and a massive commercial arm. Disney takes its Princesses very seriously: when Rapunzel became the tenth official Princess, she had a ‘coronation’ in Kensington Palace in London.

Type
Chapter
Information
Future Law
Emerging Technology, Regulation and Ethics
, pp. 13 - 40
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×