Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-nmvwc Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-16T23:25:00.716Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

11 - Jacobi and Kierkegaard

from Part III - Jacobi and the Revival of Socraticism: The Muenster Circle and Existentialism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 February 2023

Alexander J. B. Hampton
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
Get access

Summary

Jacobi’s influence on the founder of so-called existentialism, Søren Kierkegaard, has rarely been examined. This chapter explores Kierkegaard’s critical and somewhat polemical discussion of Jacobi’s notion of the “leap” in Concluding Unscientific Postscript, which not only shows that Kierkegaard was acquainted with Jacobi’s major work, Concerning the Doctrine of Spinoza but how it shaped Kierkegaard’s own particular development of the salto mortale.

Type
Chapter
Information
Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi and the Ends of the Enlightenment
Religion, Philosophy, and Reason at the Crux of Modernity
, pp. 200 - 224
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Ameriks, Karl, ed. The Cambridge Companion to German Idealism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fichte, Johann Gottlieb. The System of Ethics in Accordance with the Wissenschaftslehre. Edited and translated by Breazeale, Daniel and Zöller, Günter. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.Google Scholar
Heidegger, Martin. Being and Time. Translated by John MacQuarrie and Edward Robinson. New York: Harper and Row, 1962.Google Scholar
Henrich, Dieter. Konzepte Essays zur Philosophie in der Zeit. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1987.Google Scholar
Henrich, Dieter. “Der Ursprung der Doppelphilosophie: Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi’s Bedeutung für das nachkantische Denken.” In Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi: Präsident der Akademie, Philosoph, Theoretiker der Sprache, edited by Henrich, Dieter. Munich: Beck, 1993.Google Scholar
Hutter, Axel. Geschichtliche Vernunft: Die Weiterführung der Kantischen Vernunftskritik in der Spätphilosophie Schellings. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1996.Google Scholar
Kierkegaard, Søren. The Concept of Anxiety. Kierkegaard’s Writings 8. Edited and translated by Thomte, Reidar. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1981.Google Scholar
Kierkegaard, Søren. Either/Or. Kierkegaard’s Writings 4. Edited and translated by Howard, V. Hong and Edna, H. Hong. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1987.Google Scholar
Kierkegaard, Søren. Concluding Unscientific Postscript to the Philosophical Crumbs. Edited and translated by Hannay, Alastair. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Pinkard, Terry. German Philosophy 1760–1860: The Legacy of Idealism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.Google Scholar
Sandkaulen, Birgit. Jacobis Philosophie: Ûber den Widerspruch zwischen System und Freiheit. Hamburg: Meiner, 2019.Google Scholar
Schelling, Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph. On the History of Modern Philosophy. Translated by Andrew Bowie. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Stolzenberg, Jürgen. Kierkegaard und Fichte: Praktische und religiöse Subjektivität. Edited by Stolzenberg, Jürgen and Rapic, Smail. Berlin: de Gruyter, 2010.Google Scholar
Strawson, Peter Frederick. Individuals: An Essay in Descriptive Metaphysics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1959.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×