Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-pjpqr Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-15T18:28:21.743Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Examination 7: Answers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2012

Aidan Shaw
Affiliation:
Guy's and St Thomas’ Hospitals
Benjamin Smith
Affiliation:
Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals
David C. Howlett
Affiliation:
Eastbourne District General Hospital
Get access

Summary

Coronal CT of the sinuses

  1. A Crista galli.

  2. B Right infraorbital foramen.

  3. C Right inferior turbinate.

  4. D Hard palate.

  5. E Right infraorbital nerve, artery or vein.

‘Crista galli’ is Latin for ‘crest of the cock’. It is a midline ridge of bone that projects from the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone. The falx cerebri attaches here, and the olfactory bulbs lie on either side. The infraorbital foramen transmits the infraorbital nerve, artery and vein, which can be damaged or compressed in orbital blowout fractures. The infraorbital nerve is a branch of the maxillary nerve, which is the second division of the trigeminal nerve (CN V).

There are three turbinates; superior, middle and inferior. They function to control the flow of air and ensure that even air humidification and warming takes place over an increased surface area. The osteomeatal complex is a functional entity that includes the middle turbinate, uncinate process, bulla ethmoidalis, hiatus semilunaris and ethmoid infundibulum. It is the common pathway for drainage and ventilation of the frontal, maxillary and ethmoid sinuses.

MR angiogram of the neck

  1. A Right vertebral artery.

  2. B Right common carotid artery.

  3. C Right internal thoracic artery.

  4. D Left common carotid artery.

  5. E Left vertebral artery.

The paired vertebral arteries are branches of the first part of the subclavian arteries and course through the transverse foramen of each cervical vertebra from C6 to C1. After C1, the vertebral arteries pass through the suboccipital triangle and enter the foramen magnum.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×