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9 - Common Commercial Policy

Bart Van Vooren
Affiliation:
ALTIUS, Brussels
Ramses A. Wessel
Affiliation:
University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands
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Summary

Central issues

  • This chapter deals with a policy area that is traditionally seen as forming the heart of EU external relations law. The CCP not only formed the start of the development of EU external relations, it still forms a key example of a policy area in which internal and external policies are inextricably linked.

  • In this chapter we will analyse the principles and instruments of the CCP. Irrespective of the scarce references in primary law, the Union has developed several instruments to shape this policy area. We also look at the roles of the Union institutions and the applicable decision-making procedures.

  • Finally, this chapter will analyse the relation between the internal market and the external trade, and address the question of how this relationship influenced the development of CCP.

  • Introduction

    The CCP is ‘the mother of all EU external relations policies’. In the early days, many authors would even have a tendency to equate EU external relations law to CCP, and still many textbooks would explain basic notions underlying EU external relations law with extensive references to CCP, so as to illustrate the development of the scope of an existing competence. It is true that the existence, nature and scope of external competences (see Chapters 3–5) have largely been defined by reference to early cases in the area of CCP. In this chapter we will occasionally return to these basic notions, but will predominantly look at CCP as an institutional and substantive policy area.

    Type
    Chapter
    Information
    EU External Relations Law
    Text, Cases and Materials
    , pp. 276 - 310
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Print publication year: 2014

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