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31 - Family therapy

from Section 5 - Treatments in Psychiatry

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 August 2009

Robin M. Murray
Affiliation:
King's College London
Kenneth S. Kendler
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University
Peter McGuffin
Affiliation:
University of Wales College of Medicine
Simon Wessely
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychiatry, London
David J. Castle
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne
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Summary

Boszormenyi-Nagy addressed a transgenerational theme by describing how family relationships between generations and between adults in a marriage were organised around a ledger of entitlements and obligation. The system-oriented approaches assume that the family is a system observed by the therapist. The psychoeducational approach and family crisis intervention have evolved in the context of the burden that schizophrenia places on the family and the potential for members to influence its course. A typology of family psychopathology allowing the diagnostician to differentiate patterns of dysfunction and appropriate interventions is elusive. An inherent challenge is determining which aspects of family functioning are core in creating a family typology. Family assessment, an extension of conventional individual assessment, adds a broader context to the final formulation. Its four phases are as follows: history from the patient, a provisional formulation concerning the relevance of family issues, family interview and a revised formulation.
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Essential Psychiatry , pp. 678 - 691
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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