Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-846f6c7c4f-xq4m6 Total loading time: 0.834 Render date: 2022-07-07T03:51:27.075Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

11 - Evidence-based pharmacotherapy of nicotine and alcohol dependence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2012

Dan Stein
Affiliation:
University of Cape Town
Bernard Lerer
Affiliation:
Hadassah-Hebrew Medical Centre
Stephen M. Stahl
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
Get access

Summary

This chapter covers nicotine and alcohol dependence for evidence-based pharmacotherapy. First-line pharmacological interventions include varenicline as probably the most effective treatment, directly followed by nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and bupropion. Second-line treatments include nortryptiline and clonidine with good effect sizes, but a higher probability of side-effects. Combining different types of NRT and the combination of NRT with other effective medications may result in better outcomes. Different kinds of medication are currently available for the treatment of alcohol dependence with different goals and different mechanisms of action, e.g. creation of aversive reaction to alcohol by blocking the metabolism of ethanol (disuliram), by reducing the positive reinforcing effect of alcohol (e.g. naltrexone), or the reduction of craving and the negative reinforcing effect of alcohol (e.g. acamprosate). The chapter discusses the findings regarding baclofen, gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), and various types of antidepressants.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×