Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-nmvwc Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-13T22:55:03.014Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

2 - Theoretical development

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2022

Sheila Peace
Affiliation:
The Open University, Milton Keynes
Get access

Summary

Introduction

To establish the scope of this chapter, I return to two key factors. First, as outlined in Figure 0.1, environments of ageing can be seen on different but interrelating spatial scales. Second, the relationship between environments seen at these different levels relates to individual behaviour and quality of life, which is revealed through interactions. These factors are considered in the light of theoretical developments taken from two bodies of work, social gerontology (in particular environmental gerontology) and the developing theoretical literature in geographical gerontology that extends our understanding of ageing through the spatial turn, as seen in Chapter 1. In general, theoretical perspectives from social gerontology are centred on the individual based at the local-or micro-level, what can be called the near environment – the dwelling, neighbourhood or community, with some matters relating to city, town and village. The concern here is how ideas can be extended so that environments of ageing can be recognised at both meso- and macro-levels of analysis, involving individual and collective behaviour. Here, perspectives offered by geographical gerontology may be beneficial, as they extend interdisciplinarity and participatory methods and particular theoretical approaches.

Environmental gerontology: theoretical influences

As clinical, physiological and psychological aspects of gerontology were studied during the 20th century (Kontos, 2005a), a human ecological perspective developed in the US and in Europe, and this underpins many ideas in environmental gerontology (Kleemier, 1959, 1961; Bronfenbrenner, 1979; Bernard and Rowles, 2013; Rowles and Bernard, 2013). To discuss the historical and contemporary theory that has informed this field, literature concerned with the contextualisation of human ageing is drawn upon (see Peace et al, 2007; Oswald& Wahl, 2010; Scheidt and Schwarz, 2013). While this material originates across the social sciences, early theoretical development comes primarily from psychology and sociology. These disciplines capture the tension between individual and society that may be defined as person– environment (P–E) interaction.

Prior to the 1960s, early work in the US and Europe saw developmental psychologists identify the relationship between personal needs, motivating behaviour and what was called environmental press (Murray, 1938; Lewin, 1936, 1951), while urban sociologists reported the negative impact of environmental deprivation on health and well-being, with research into city living in Chicago developing the concept of urban ecology (Park and Burgess, 1925).

Type
Chapter
Information
The Environments of Ageing
Space, Place and Materiality
, pp. 24 - 48
Publisher: Bristol University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Theoretical development
  • Sheila Peace, The Open University, Milton Keynes
  • Book: The Environments of Ageing
  • Online publication: 15 September 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.46692/9781447310570.004
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Theoretical development
  • Sheila Peace, The Open University, Milton Keynes
  • Book: The Environments of Ageing
  • Online publication: 15 September 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.46692/9781447310570.004
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Theoretical development
  • Sheila Peace, The Open University, Milton Keynes
  • Book: The Environments of Ageing
  • Online publication: 15 September 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.46692/9781447310570.004
Available formats
×