Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-jlrq2 Total loading time: 0.595 Render date: 2022-11-28T13:25:18.492Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 December 2009

Benny Bing
Affiliation:
Atlanta, GA
Benny Bing
Affiliation:
Georgia Institute of Technology
Get access

Summary

Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) networks have become mainstream over the last few years. What started out as cable replacement for static desktops in indoor networks has been extended to fully mobile broadband applications involving moving vehicles, high-speed trains, and even airplanes. Perhaps lesser known is the proliferation of unique Wi-Fi applications, from Wi-Fi mosquito nets (for controlling malaria outbreaks) to Wi-Fi electric utility and parking meters to Wi-Fi control of garden hose sprinklers. The global revenue for Wi-Fi was nearly $3 billion at the end of 2006 and will continue its upward trend in the coming years.

When Wi-Fi wireless LANs were first deployed, they give laptop and PDA users the same freedom with data that cellphones provide for voice. However, such networks need not transfer purely data traffic. It can also support packetized voice and video transmission. People today are spending huge amounts of money, even from office to office, calling by cellphones. With a Wi-Fi infrastructure, it costs them a fraction of what it will cost them using cellphones or any other equipment. Thus, voice telephony products based on 802.11 have recently emerged. A more compelling use of Wi-Fi is in overcoming the inherent limitations of wireless WANs. An increasing number of municipal governments around the world and virtually every major city in the U.S. are financing the deployment of Wi-Fi mesh networks with the overall aim of providing ubiquitous Internet access and enhanced public services.

Type
Chapter
Information
Emerging Technologies in Wireless LANs
Theory, Design, and Deployment
, pp. xxxv - xlii
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Preface
  • Edited by Benny Bing, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Book: Emerging Technologies in Wireless LANs
  • Online publication: 10 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511611421.003
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Preface
  • Edited by Benny Bing, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Book: Emerging Technologies in Wireless LANs
  • Online publication: 10 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511611421.003
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Preface
  • Edited by Benny Bing, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Book: Emerging Technologies in Wireless LANs
  • Online publication: 10 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511611421.003
Available formats
×