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Chapter 1 - Megara and Dialectic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2018

Thomas Bénatouïl
Affiliation:
Université de Lille
Katerina Ierodiakonou
Affiliation:
Université de Genève
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Summary

Though it also tackled issues corresponding to those handled by philosophy of language, linguistics, grammar and epistemology, Stoic dialectic was roughly the counterpart of what we call ‘logic’ today. Despite the enormous influence that Aristotle’s logic was to exert until close to our own time, it seems to have had no impact on the Stoics, who instead drew inspiration from an independent tradition whose roots can be traced back to the fifth-century practice of dialectic, reflection about which set in train the developments that eventually gave rise to Stoic dialectic. Evidence about the Stoics' precursors, frequently referred to as ‘dialecticians’, is scarce, however. The traditional view, recently challenged, holds that they belonged to a so-called Megaric school of philosophy. This chapter aims to see what can discovered about these shadowy figures and their contributions. Part of its burden is to urge caution about the question of their school affiliation.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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