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Planet formation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 October 2009

Jack J. Lissauer
Affiliation:
Space Science & Astrobiology Division, MS 245-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA
Mario Livio
Affiliation:
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore
Kailash Sahu
Affiliation:
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore
Jeff Valenti
Affiliation:
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore
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Summary

Models of planetary growth are based upon data from our own Solar System, as well as observations of extrasolar planets and the circumstellar environments of young stars. Collapse of molecular cloud cores leads to central condensations (protostars) surrounded by higher specific angular momentum circumstellar disks. Planets form within such disks, and play a major role in disk evolution. Terrestrial planets are formed within disks around young stars via the accumulation of small dust grains into larger and larger bodies—until the planetary orbits become separated enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. A potential hazard to planetary systems is radial decay of planetary orbits, resulting from interactions between the planets and the natal disk. Massive planets can sweep up disk material in their vicinity, eject planetesimals and small planets into interstellar space or into their star, and confine disks in radius and azimuth. Small planetary bodies (asteroids and comets) can sequester solid grains for long periods of time and subsequently release them.

Type
Chapter
Information
A Decade of Extrasolar Planets around Normal Stars
Proceedings of the Space Telescope Science Institute Symposium, held in Baltimore, Maryland May 2–5, 2005
, pp. 121 - 137
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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  • Planet formation
    • By Jack J. Lissauer, Space Science & Astrobiology Division, MS 245-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA
  • Edited by Mario Livio, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Kailash Sahu, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Jeff Valenti, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore
  • Book: A Decade of Extrasolar Planets around Normal Stars
  • Online publication: 22 October 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511536304.011
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  • Planet formation
    • By Jack J. Lissauer, Space Science & Astrobiology Division, MS 245-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA
  • Edited by Mario Livio, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Kailash Sahu, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Jeff Valenti, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore
  • Book: A Decade of Extrasolar Planets around Normal Stars
  • Online publication: 22 October 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511536304.011
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Planet formation
    • By Jack J. Lissauer, Space Science & Astrobiology Division, MS 245-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA
  • Edited by Mario Livio, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Kailash Sahu, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Jeff Valenti, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore
  • Book: A Decade of Extrasolar Planets around Normal Stars
  • Online publication: 22 October 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511536304.011
Available formats
×