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Chapter 7 - Post–Cardiac Arrest EEG

from Part I - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2024

Neville M. Jadeja
Affiliation:
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Kyle C. Rossi
Affiliation:
University of Massachusetts Medical School
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Summary

This chapter focuses on the variety of different EEG patterns that can be seen after hypoxic ischemic brain injury, which often produces some of the most severe encephalopathies. Common post–cardiac arrest findings include discontinuity, burst suppression, background voltage attenuation and suppression, lack of EEG reactivity, seizures, myoclonus, and status epilepticus. The prognostic significance of these findings is discussed. Finally, the topic of using EEG as a confirmatory tool in brain death protocols is introduced.

Type
Chapter
Information
Critical Care EEG Basics
Rapid Bedside EEG Reading for Acute Care Providers
, pp. 99 - 108
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2024

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References

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Bauer, G, Unterberger, I. Anoxic myoclonic status epilepticus. In Drislane, FW, Kaplan, PW (Eds.). Status Epilepticus: A Clinical Perspective. Second Edition. Springer Science+Business Media LLC, 2018.Google Scholar
Rossetti, AO. Should postanoxic status epilepticus be treated aggressively? – No! Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology. 2015 Dec;32(6):447–8.Google Scholar
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