Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-6b989bf9dc-llglr Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-14T20:54:06.139Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

9 - Sociality in Primates

from Part II - Vertebrates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 April 2017

Dustin R. Rubenstein
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Patrick Abbot
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University, Tennessee
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Alberts, S. C. (2012) Magnitude and sources of variation in male reproductive performance. In: Mitani, J. C., Call, J. Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A., & Silk, J. B. (eds.) The Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 412431.Google Scholar
Alberts, S. C., Buchan, J. C., & Altmann, J. (2006) Sexual selection in wild baboons: From mating opportunities to paternity success. Animal Behaviour, 72, 11771196.Google Scholar
Alexander, R. D. (1974) The evolution of social behavior. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 5, 325383.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alexander, R. D., Hoogland, J. L., Howard, R. D., Noonan, K. M., & Sherman, P. W. (1979) Sexual dimorphisms and breeding systems in pinnipeds, ungulates, primates, and humans. In: Chagnon, N. A. & Irons, W. (eds.) Evolutionary Biology and Human Social Behavior: An Anthropological Perspective. North Scituate/Ma: Duxbury, pp. 402435.Google Scholar
Altmann, J. (1979) Age cohorts as paternal sibships. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 6, 161–4.Google Scholar
Altmann, J., Alberts, S. C., Haines, S. A., et al. (1996) Behavior predicts genetic structure in a wild primate group. Proceeding of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America, 93, 57975801.Google Scholar
Anzenberger, G. & Falk, B. (2012) Monogamy and family life in callitrichid monkeys: Deviations, social dynamics and captive management. International Zoo Yearbook, 46, 109122.Google Scholar
Arbib, M. A., Liebal, K., & Pika, S. (2008) Primate vocalization, gesture, and the evolution of human language. Current Anthropology, 49, 10531076.Google Scholar
Aureli, F., Schaffner, C. M., Boesch, C., et al. (2008) Fission–fusion dynamics: New research frameworks. Current Anthropology, 49, 627654.Google Scholar
Austad, S. N. & Fischer, K. E. (1992) Primate longevity: Its place in the mammalian scheme. American Journal of Primatology, 28, 251261.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bachmann, C. & Kummer, H. (1980) Male assessment of female choice in hamadryas baboons. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 6, 315321.Google Scholar
Balasubramaniam, K. N., Dittmar, K., Berman, C. M., et al. (2012) Hierarchical steepness and phylogenetic models: Phylogenetic signals in Macaca. Animal Behaviour, 83, 12071218.Google Scholar
Barelli, C., Matsudaira, K., Wolf, T., et al. (2013) Extra-pair paternity confirmed in wild white-handed gibbons. American Journal of Primatology, 75, 11851195.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barrett, L., Henzi, S. P., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2003) Primate cognition: From ‘what now?’ to ‘what if?’. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 7, 494497.Google Scholar
Barton, R. A., Byrne, R. W., & Whiten, A. (1996) Ecology, feeding competition and social structure in baboons. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 38, 321329.Google Scholar
Bettridge, C. M. & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2013) Predation as a determinant of minimum group size in baboons. Folia Primatologica, 83, 332352.Google Scholar
Bradley, B. J., Robbins, M. M., Williamson, E. A., et al. (2005) Mountain gorilla tug-of-war: silverbacks have limited control over reproduction in multimale groups. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102, 94189423.Google Scholar
Brown, C. & Laland, K. N. (2003) Social learning in fishes: A review. Fish and Fisheries, 4, 280288.Google Scholar
Buchan, J. C., Alberts, S. C., Silk, J. B., & Altmann, J. (2003) True paternal care in a multi-male primate society. Nature, 425, 179181Google Scholar
Byrne, R. W. & Corp, N. (2004) Neocortex size predicts deception rate in primates. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 271, 16931699.Google Scholar
Byrne, R. W. & Whiten, A. (1990) Tactical deception in primates: The 1990 database. Primate Report, 27, 1101.Google Scholar
Cameron, E. Z., Setsaas, T. H., & Linklater, W. L. (2009) Social bonds between unrelated females increase reproductive success in feral horses. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 106, 13850138503.Google Scholar
Carpenter, C. R. (1934) A field study of the behavior and social relations of howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata). Comparative Psychology Monographs, 10, 1168.Google Scholar
Carpenter, C. R. (1940) A field study in Siam of the behavior and social relations of the gibbon (Hylobates lar). Comparative Psychology Monographs, 16, 1212.Google Scholar
Carpenter, C. R. (1942) Sexual behavior of free-ranging rhesus monkeys, Macaca mulatta. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 33, 113142.Google Scholar
Chapman, C. A., Rothman, J. M., & Lambert, J. E. (2012) Food as a selective force in primates. In: Mitani, J. C., Call, J., Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A., & Silk, J. B. (eds.) The Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 149168.Google Scholar
Charpentier, M. J., Peignot, P., Hossaert–McKey, M., & Wickings, E. J. (2007) Kin discrimination in juvenile mandrills, Mandrillus sphinx. Animal Behaviour, 73, 3745.Google Scholar
Charpentier, M. J., Deubel, D., & Peignot, P. (2008) Relatedness and social behaviors in Cercopithecus solatus. International Journal of Primatology, 29, 487495.Google Scholar
Cheney, D. L. & Seyfarth, R. M. (1980) Vocal recognition in free-ranging vervet monkeys. Animal Behaviour, 28, 362367.Google Scholar
Cheney, D. L. & Seyfarth, R. M. (1986) The recognition of social alliances among vervet monkeys. Animal Behaviour, 34, 17221731.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cheney, D. L. & Seyfarth, R. M. (1989) Redirected aggression and reconciliation among vervet monkeys, Cercopithecus aethiops. Behaviour, 110, 258275.Google Scholar
Chepko-Sade, B. D. & Sade, D. S. (1979) Patterns of group splitting within matrilineal kinship groups: A study of social group structure in Macaca mulatta (Cercopithecidae: Primates). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 5, 6786.Google Scholar
Cheverud, J. M., Buettner-Janusch, J., & Sade, D. (1978) Social group fission and the origin of intergroup genetic differentiation among the rhesus monkeys of Cayo Santiago. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 49, 449456.Google Scholar
Clayton, N. S., Dally, J. M., & Emery, N. J., (2007) Social cognition by food-caching corvids. The western scrub-jay as a natural psychologist. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B, 362, 507522.Google Scholar
Clutton-Brock, T. H. & Harvey, P. H. (1977) Primate ecology and social organization. Journal of Zoology, 183, 139.Google Scholar
Clutton-Brock, T. H. & Janson, C. H. (2012) Primate socioecology at the crossroads: Past, present, and future. Evolutionary Anthropology, 21, 136150.Google Scholar
Corbin, G. D. & Schmid, J. (1995) Insect secretions determine habitat use patterns by a female lesser mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus). American Journal of Primatology, 37, 317324.Google Scholar
Cords, M. (2000) The number of males in guenon groups. In: Kappeler, P. M. (ed.) Primate Males: Causes and Consequences of Variation in Group Composition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 8496.Google Scholar
Cords, M. (2007) Primates in perspective. International Journal of Primatology, 28, 497500.Google Scholar
Cords, M. (2012) The Thirty-year blues: What we know and don’t know about life history, group size, and group fission of blue monkeys in the Kakamega Forest, Kenya. In: Kappeler, P. M. & Watts, D. P. (eds.) Long-term field studies of primates. Springer: Berlin, pp. 289311.Google Scholar
Dammhahn, M. & Kappeler, P. M. (2009) Females go where the food is: Does the socio–ecological model explain variation in social organisation of solitary foragers? Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 63, 939952.Google Scholar
de Ruiter, J. D. & Geffen, E. (1998) Relatedness of matrilines, dispersing males and social groups in long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 265, 7987.Google Scholar
Di Fiore, A. (2009) Genetic approaches to the study of dispersal and kinship in New World primates. In: Garber, P. A., Estrada, A., Bicca-Marques, J. C., Heymann, E. W. & Strier, K. B. (eds.) South American Primates. New York: Springer, pp. 211–50.Google Scholar
Di Fiore, A. (2012) Genetic consequences of primate social organization. Mitani, J. C., Call, J., Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A., & Silk, J. B. (eds.) The Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 269–92.Google Scholar
Di Fiore, A. & Rendall, D. (1994) Evolution of social organization: A reappraisal for primates by using phylogenetic methods. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 91, 99419945.Google Scholar
Di Fiore, A., Link, A., Schmitt, C. A., & Spehar, S. N. (2009) Dispersal patterns in sympatric woolly and spider monkeys: Integrating molecular and observational data. Behaviour, 146, 437470.Google Scholar
Dittus, W. P. (1988) Group fission among wild toque macaques as a consequence of female resource competition and environmental stress. Animal Behaviour, 36, 16261645.Google Scholar
Dobson, S. D. (2009) Socioecological correlates of facial mobility in nonhuman anthropoids. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 139, 413420.Google Scholar
Donati, G., Baldi, N., Morelli, V., Ganzhorn, J. U. and Borgognini-Tarli, S. M. (2009) Proximate & ultimate determinants of cathemeral activity in brown lemurs. Animal Behaviour, 77, 317325.Google Scholar
Dröscher, I. & Kappeler, P. M. (2013) Defining the low end of primate social complexity: The social organization of the nocturnal white-footed sportive lemur (Lepilemur leucopus). International Journal of Primatology, 34, 12251243.Google Scholar
Dunbar, R. I. M. (1992) Neocortex size as a constraint on group size in primates. Journal of Human Evolution, 22, 469493.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dunbar, R. I. M. (1995) The mating system of callitrichid primates. I. Conditions for the coevolution of pair bonding and twinning. Animal Behaviour, 50, 10571070.Google Scholar
Dunbar, R. I. M. (2003) The social brain: Mind, language, and society in evolutionary perspective. Annual Review of Anthropology, 32, 163181.Google Scholar
Dunbar, R. I. M. and Bever, J. (2010) Neocortex size predicts group size in carnivores and some insectivores. Ethology, 104, 695708.Google Scholar
Eberle, M. & Kappeler, P. M. (2006) Family insurance: Kin selection and cooperative breeding in a solitary primate (Microcebus murinus). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 60, 582588.Google Scholar
Emery, N. J. (2004) Are corvids ‘feathered apes’? Cognitive evolution in crows, jays, rooks, and jackdaws. In: Watanabe, S. (ed.) Comparative Analysis of Minds. Tokyo: Keio University Press, pp. 181213.Google Scholar
Emery, N. J., Seed, A. M., von Bayern, A. M. P., & Clayton, N. S. (2007) Cognitive adaptations of social bonding in birds. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B, 362, 489505.Google Scholar
Emlen, S. T. (1994) Benefits, constraints and the evolution of the family. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 9, 282284.Google Scholar
Eriksson, J., Siedel, H., Lukas, D., et al. (2006) Y–chromosome analysis confirms highly sex–biased dispersal and suggests a low male effective population size in bonobos (Pan paniscus) Molecular Ecology, 15, 939949.Google Scholar
Fernandez-Duque, E., Di Fiore, A., & Huck, M. (2012) The behavior, ecology, and social evolution of New World monkeys. In: Mitani, J. C., Call, J., Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A., & Silk, J. B. (eds.) Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 4364.Google Scholar
Fichtel, C. (2012) Predation. In: Mitani, J. C., Call, J., Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A. & Silk, J. B. (eds.) Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 169–94.Google Scholar
Fichtel, C., Zucchini, W., & Hilgartner, R. (2011) Out of sight but not out of mind? Behavioral coordination in red-tailed sportive lemurs (Lepilemur ruficaudatus). International Journal of Primatology, 32, 13831396.Google Scholar
Fietz, J., Zischler, H., Schwiegk, C., Tomiuk, J., Dausmann, K. H., & Ganzhorn, J. U. (2000) High rates of extra-pair young in the pair–living fat-tailed dwarf lemur, Cheirogaleus medius. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 49, 817.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Finlay, B. L. & Darlington, R. B. (1995) Linked regularities in the development and evolution of mammalian brains. Science, 268, 15781584.Google Scholar
Freeland, W. J. (1976) Pathogens and the evolution of primate sociality. Biotropica, 8, 1224.Google Scholar
Frère, C. H., Krützen, M., Mann, J., Connor, R. C., Bejder, L., & Sherwin, W. B. (2010) Social and genetic interactions drive fitness variation in a free–living dolphin population. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107, 1994919954.Google Scholar
Gerloff, U., Hartung, B., Fruth, B., Hohmann, G., & Tautz, D. (1999) Intracommunity relationships, dispersal pattern and paternity success in a wild living community of bonobos (Pan paniscus) determined from DNA analysis of faecal samples. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 266, 11891195.Google Scholar
Gouzoules, H., Gouzoules, S., & Miller, K. (1996) Skeptical responding in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). International Journal of Primatology, 17, 549–68.Google Scholar
Griffith, S. C., Owens, I. P. F., & Thuman, K. A. (2002) Extra pair paternity in birds: A review of interspecific variation and adaptive function. Molecular Ecology, 11, 21952212.Google Scholar
Griffin, R. H., Matthews, L. J., & Nunn, C. L. (2012) Evolutionary disequilibrium and activity period in primates: A bayesian phylogenetic approach. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 147, 409416.Google Scholar
Grueter, C. C., Chapais, B., & Zinner, D. (2012) Evolution of multilevel social systems in nonhuman primates and humans. International Journal of Primatology, 33, 10021037.Google Scholar
Gursky, S. (2002) Determinants of gregariousness in the spectral tarsier (Prosimian: Tarsius spectrum). Journal of Zoology, 256, 401410.Google Scholar
Hammond, R. L., Handley, L. J. L., Winney, B. J., Bruford, M. W., & Perrin, N. (2006) Genetic evidence for female-biased dispersal and gene flow in a polygynous primate. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 273, 479484.Google Scholar
Hansell, M. (2007) Built by Animals: The Natural History of Animal Architecture. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Hapke, A., Zinner, D., & Zischler, H. (2001) Mitochondrial DNA variation in Eritrean hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas hamadryas): Life history influences population genetic structure. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 50, 483492.Google Scholar
Hill, R. A. (2006) Why be diurnal? Or, why not be cathemeral? Folia Primatologica, 77, 7286.Google Scholar
Hill, R. A. & Lee, P. C. (1998) Predation risk as an influence on group size in cercopithecoid primates: Implications for social structure. Journal of Zoology, 245, 447456.Google Scholar
Hinde, R. A. (1976) Interactions, relationships and social structure. Man, 11, 117.Google Scholar
Holekamp, K. E. (2007) Questioning the social intelligence hypothesis. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 11, 6569.Google Scholar
Hrdy, S. B. & Hausfater, G. (eds.) (1984) Infanticide: Comparative and Evolutionary Perspectives. New York: Aldine.Google Scholar
Huchard, E., Knapp, L.A., Wang, J., Raymond, M., & Cowlishaw, G. (2010) MHC, mate choice and heterozygote advantage in a wild social primate. Molecular Ecology 19, 25452561Google Scholar
Huck, M., Fernandez-Duque, E., Babb, P., & Schurr, T. (2014) Correlates of genetic monogamy in socially monogamous mammals: Insights from Azara’s owl monkeys. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 281, 20140195.Google Scholar
Ichino, S. (2006) Troop fission in wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at Berenty, Madagascar. American Journal of Primatology, 68, 97102.Google Scholar
Ichino, S. & Koyama, N. (2006) Social changes in a wild population of ringtailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at Berenty, Madagascar. In: Jolly, A., Sussman, R. W., Koyama, N. & Rasamimanana, H. R. (eds.) Ringtailed Lemur Biology: Lemur catta in Madagascar. New York: Springer, pp. 233–44.Google Scholar
Inoue, E., Akomo-Okoue, E. F., Ando, C., et al. (2013) Male genetic structure and paternity in western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 151, 583588.Google Scholar
Isbell, L. A. (1991) Contest and scramble competition: Patterns of female aggression and ranging behavior among primates. Behavioral Ecology, 2, 143155.Google Scholar
Isbell, L. A. (1994) Predation on primates: Ecological patterns and evolutionary consequences. Evolutionary Anthropology, 3, 6171.Google Scholar
Isler, K. & van Schaik, C. P. (2006) Metabolic costs of brain size evolution. Biology Letters, 2, 557560.Google Scholar
Janson, C. H. (1998) Testing the predation hypothesis for vertebrate sociality: Prospects and pitfalls. Behaviour, 135, 389410.Google Scholar
Janson, C. H. (2000). Primate socioecology: The end of a golden Age. Evolutionary Anthropology. 9, 7386.Google Scholar
Janson, C. H. (2012) Reconciling rigor and range: Observations, experiments, and quasi-experiments in field primatology. International Journal of Primatology, 33, 520541.Google Scholar
Janson, C. H. & Byrne, R. (2007) What wild primates know about resources: Opening up the black box. Animal Cognition, 10, 357367.Google Scholar
Janson, C. H. & Goldsmith, M. L. (1995) Predicting group size in primates: Foraging costs and predation risks. Behavioral Ecology, 6, 326336.Google Scholar
Jerison, H. J. (1973) Evolution of the Brain and Intelligence. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Joffe, T. H. & Dunbar, R. I. M. (1997) Visual and socio-cognitive information processing in primate brain evolution. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 264, 13031307Google Scholar
Judge, D. A. & Carey, J. R. (2000) Postreproductive life predicted by primate patterns. Journal of Gerontology A, 55, B201B2019.Google Scholar
Kappeler, P. M. (1997) Determinants of primate social organization: Comparative evidence and new insights from Malagasy lemurs. Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, 72, 111151.Google Scholar
Kappeler, P.M. (2000) Causes and consequences of unusual sex ratios among lemurs. In: Kappeler, P. (ed.) Primate Males: Causes and Consequences of Variation in Group Composition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 5563.Google Scholar
Kappeler, P. M. (2012) The behavioral ecology of strepsirrhines and tarsiers. In: Mitani, J. C., Call, J., Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A., & Silk, J. B. (eds.) Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 1742.Google Scholar
Kappeler, P. M. & Fichtel, C. (2012) A fifteen-year perspective on the social organization and life history of sifaka in Kirindy Forest. In: Kappeler, P. M. & Watts, D. P. (eds.) Long-Term Field Studies of Primates. Heidelberg: Springer, pp. 101121.Google Scholar
Kappeler, P. M. & Schäffler, L. (2008) The lemur syndrome unresolved: Extreme male reproductive skew in sifakas ( Propithecus verreauxi ), a sexually monomorphic primate with female dominance. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 62, 10071015.Google Scholar
Kappeler, P. M. & van Schaik, C. P. (2002) Evolution of primate social systems. International Journal of Primatology, 23, 707740.Google Scholar
Kappeler, P. M., Wimmer, B., Zinner, D. P., & Tautz, D. (2002) The hidden matrilineal structure of a solitary lemur: Implications for primate social evolution. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 269, 17551763.Google Scholar
Kappeler, P. M., Barrett, L., Blumstein, D. T., & Clutton-Brock, T. H. (2013) Constraints and flexibility in mammalian social behaviour: Introduction and synthesis. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 368, 20120337.Google Scholar
Kenyon, M., Roos, C., Binh, V. T., & Chivers, D. (2011) Extrapair paternity in golden-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus gabriellae) in the secondary lowland forest of Cat Tien National Park, Vietnam. Folia Primatologica, 82, 154164.Google Scholar
Kitchen, D. M., Cheney, D. L., & Seyfarth, R. M. (2005) Male chacma baboons (Papio hamadryas ursinus) discriminate loud call contests between rivals of different relative ranks. Animal Cognition, 8, 16.Google Scholar
Koenig, A. (2002) Competition for resources and its behavioral consequences among female primates. International Journal of Primatology, 23, 759783.Google Scholar
Kokko, H., Johnstone, R. A., & Clutton-Brock, T. H. (2001) The evolution of cooperative breeding during group augmentation. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 268, 187196.Google Scholar
Koyama, N. F. (2003) Matrilineal cohesion and social networks in Macaca fuscata. International Journal of Primatology, 24, 797811.Google Scholar
Krause, J. & Ruxton, G. D. (2002) Living in Groups. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Kudo, H. & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2001) Neocortex size and social network size in primates. Animal Behaviour, 62, 711722.Google Scholar
Kuester, J. & Paul, A. (1997) Group fission in Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) at Affenberg Salem. International Journal of Primatology, 18, 941966.Google Scholar
Launhardt, K., Borries, C., Hardt, C., Epplen, J. T., & Winkler, P. (2001) Paternity analysis of alternative male reproductive routes among the langurs (Semnopithecus entellus) of Ramnagar. Animal Behaviour, 61, 5364.Google Scholar
Lawler, R. R., Richard, A. F., & Riley, M. A. (2003) Genetic population structure of the white sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi verreauxi) at Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, southwest Madagascar (1992–2001). Molecular Ecology, 12, 23072317.Google Scholar
Lehman, S. M. & Fleagle, J. G. (2005) Biogeography and primates: A review. In: Lehman, S. M., and Fleagle, J. G (eds.) Primate Biogeography. Springer, US. pp. 158.Google Scholar
Lindenfors, P., Fröberg, L., & Nunn, C. L. (2004) Females drive primate social evolution. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 271(Suppl 3), S101S103.Google Scholar
Lindstedt, S. L. & Calder, W. A. III (1981) Body size, physiological time, and longevity of homeothermic animals. Quarterly Review of Biology, 56, 116.Google Scholar
Lukas, D. & Clutton-Brock, T. H. (2013) The evolution of social monogamy in mammals. Science, 341, 526530.Google Scholar
Lukas, D., Reynolds, V., Boesch, C., & Vigilant, L. (2005) To what extent does living in a group mean living with kin? Molecular Ecology, 14, 21812196.Google Scholar
Marino, L. (1996) What can dolphins tell us about primate evolution? Evolutionary Anthropology, 5, 8185.Google Scholar
Matsuzawa, T. & McGrew, W. C. (2008) Kinji Imanishi and Sixty years of Japanese primatology. Current Biology, 18, R587R591.Google Scholar
McComb, K. & Semple, S. (2005) Coevolution of vocal communication and sociality in primates. Biology Letters, 1, 381385.Google Scholar
Melnick, D. J. & Hoelzer, G. A. (1992) Differences in male and female macaque dispersal lead to contrasting distributions of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variation. International Journal of Primatology, 13, 379393.Google Scholar
Melnick, D. J. & Hoelzer, G. A. (1996) The population genetic consequences of macaque social organization and behaviour. In: Fa, J. E. & Lindburg, D. G. (eds.) Evolution and Ecology of Macaque Societies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 413443.Google Scholar
Melnick, D. J. & Kidd, K. K. (1983) The genetic consequences of social group fission in a wild population of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 12, 229236.Google Scholar
Ménard, N. & Vallet, D. (1993) Dynamics of fission in a wild Barbary macaque group (Macaca sylvanus). International Journal of Primatology, 14, 479500.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Missakian, E. A. (1973) The timing of fission among free-ranging rhesus monkeys. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 38, 621624.Google Scholar
Mitchell, C.L., Boinski, S., & van Schaik, C.P. (1991) Competitive regimes and female bonding in two species of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri oerstedi and S. sciureus). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 28, 5560Google Scholar
Møller, A. P. (1990) Deceptive use of alarm calls by male swallows, Hirundo rustica: A new paternity guard. Behavioral Ecology, 1, 16.Google Scholar
Morin, P. A., Moore, J. J., Chakraborty, R., Jin, L., Goodall, J., & Woodruff, D. S. (1994) Kin selection, social structure, gene flow, and the evolution of chimpanzees. Science, 265, 11931201.Google Scholar
Müller, A. E. & Thalmann, U. (2000) Origin and evolution of primate social organisation: A reconstruction. Biological Reviews, 75, 405435.Google Scholar
Muniz, L., Perry, S., Manson, J. H., Gilkenson, H., Gros–Louis, J., & Vigilant, L. (2010) Male dominance and reproductive success in wild white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) at Lomas Barbudal, Costa Rica. American Journal of Primatology, 72, 11181130.Google Scholar
Munn, C. A. (1986) Birds that ‘cry wolf’. Nature, 319, 143145.Google Scholar
Nash, L. T. (1976) Troop fission in free-ranging baboons in the Gombe Stream National Park, Tanzania. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 44, 6377.Google Scholar
Nekaris, K. A. I. & Bearder, S. K. (2011) The Lorisiform primates of Asia and mainland Africa: Diversity shrouded in darkness. In: Campbell, C. J., Fuentes, A., MacKinnon, K. C., Bearder, S. K., & Stumpf, R. M. (eds.) Primates in Perspective. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 3454.Google Scholar
Newton, P. N. (1988) The variable social organization of hanuman langurs (Presbytis entellus), infanticide, and the monopolization of females. International Journal of Primatology, 9, 5977.Google Scholar
Nguyen, N., Van Horn, R.C., Alberts, S.C., & Altmann, J. (2009) “Friendships” between new mothers and adult males: Adaptive benefits and determinants in wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 63, 13311344Google Scholar
Nietlisbach, P., Arora, N., Nater, A., Goossens, B., van Schaik, C. P., & Krützen, M. (2012) Heavily male-biased long-distance dispersal of orang-utans (genus: Pongo), as revealed by Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial genetic markers. Molecular Ecology, 21, 31733186.Google Scholar
Nsubuga, A. M., Robbins, M. M., Boesch, C., & Vigilant, L. (2008) Patterns of paternity and group fission in wild multimale mountain gorilla groups. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 135, 263274.Google Scholar
Nunn, C. L. (1999) The number of males in primate social groups: A comparative test of the socioecological model. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 46, 113.Google Scholar
Oldroyd, B. P. & Fewell, J. H. (2007) Genetic diversity promotes homeostasis in insect colonies. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 22(8), 408413.Google Scholar
Olivier, T. J., Ober, C., Buettner–Janusch, J., & Sade, D. S. (1981) Genetic differentiation among matrilines in social groups of rhesus monkeys. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 8, 279285.Google Scholar
Opie, C., Atkinson, Q. D., & Shultz, S. (2012) The evolutionary history of primate mating systems. Communicative and Integrative Biology, 5, 458461.Google Scholar
Opie, C., Atkinson, Q. D., Dunbar, R. I. M., & Shultz, S. (2013) Male infanticide leads to social monogamy in primates. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110, 1332813332.Google Scholar
Ossi, K. & Kamilar, J. M. (2006) Environmental and phylogenetic correlates of Eulemur behavior and ecology (Primates: Lemuridae). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 61, 5364.Google Scholar
Ostner, J. (2002) Social thermoregulation in redfronted lemurs (Eulemur fulvus rufus). Folia Primatologica, 73, 175180.Google Scholar
Parga, J. A. (2011) Nocturnal ranging by a diurnal primate: Are ring–tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) cathemeral? Primates, 52, 201205.Google Scholar
Passingham, R. E. (1981) Primate specializations in brain and intelligence. Symposia of the Zoological Society of London, 46, 361388.Google Scholar
Patterson, S. K., Sandel, A. A., Miller, J. A., & Mitani, J. C. (2014) Data quality and the comparative method: The case of primate group size. International Journal of Primatology, 25, 9901003.Google Scholar
Pérez-Barbería, F. J., Shultz, S., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2007) Evidence for coevolution of sociality and relative brain size in three orders of mammals. Evolution, 61, 28112821.Google Scholar
Perry, S. (2006) What cultural primatology can tell anthropologists about the evolution of culture. Annual Review of Anthropology, 35, 171190.Google Scholar
Perry, S. (2011) Social traditions and social learning in capuchin monkeys (Cebus) Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B, 366, 988996.Google Scholar
Perry, S., Barrett, H. C., & Manson, J. H. (2004) White-faced capuchin monkeys show triadic awareness in their choice of allies. Animal Behaviour, 67, 165170.Google Scholar
Perry, S., Manson, J. H., Muniz, L., Gros-Louis, J., & Vigilant, L. (2008) Kin–biased social behaviour in wild adult female white–faced capuchins, Cebus capucinus. Animal Behaviour, 76, 187199.Google Scholar
Port, M. & Kappeler, P. M. (2010) The utility of reproductive skew models in the study of male primates, a critical evaluation. Evolutionary Anthropology, 19, 4656.Google Scholar
Prothero, J. & Jürgens, K. D. (1987) Scaling of maximal lifespan in mammals: A review. In: Woodhead, A. D. & Thompson, K. H. (eds.) Evolution of Longevity in Animals. New York: Springer, pp. 4974.Google Scholar
Pusey, A. (2012) Magnitude and sources of variation in female reproductive performance. In: Mitani, J. C., Call, J., Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A., & Silk, J. B. (eds.) The Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 343366.Google Scholar
Pusey, A. E. (1987) Sex-biased dispersal and inbreeding avoidance in birds and mammals. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 2, 295299.Google Scholar
Pusey, A., and Wolf, M. (1996) Inbreeding avoidance in animals. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 11, 201206.Google Scholar
Radinsky, L. (1975) Primate Brain Evolution: Comparative studies of brains of living mammal species reveal major trends in the evolutionary development of primate brains, and analysis of endocasts from fossil primate braincases suggests when these specializations occurred. American Scientist, 63, 656663.Google Scholar
Rajpurohit, L. S., Sommer, V., & Mohnot, S. M. (1995) Wanderers between harems and bachelor bands: Male hanuman langurs (Presbytis entellus) at Jodhpur in Rajasthan. Behaviour, 132, 255299.Google Scholar
Reader, S. M. & Laland, K. N. (2001) Primate innovation: Sex, age and social rank differences. International Journal of Primatology, 22, 787805.Google Scholar
Reader, S. M. & Laland, K. N. (2002) Social intelligence, innovation and enhanced brain size in primates. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 99, 44364441.Google Scholar
Reichard, U. H., Ganpanakngan, M., & Barelli, C. (2012) White–handed gibbons of Khao Yai: Social flexibility, complex reproductive strategies, and a slow life history. In: Kappeler, P. M. and Watts, D. P. (eds.) Long-term Field Studies of Primates. Heidelberg: Springer, pp. 237258.Google Scholar
Rilling, J. K. (2006) Human and nonhuman primate brains: Are they allometrically scaled versions of the same design? Evolutionary Anthropology, 15, 6577.Google Scholar
Roberts, S. J., Nikitopoulos, E., & Cords, M. (2014) Factors affecting low resident male siring success in one-male groups of blue monkeys. Behavioral Ecology, 25, 852861Google Scholar
Robinson, J. G. (1988) Demography and group structure in wedgecapped capuchin monkeys, Cebus olivaceus. Behaviour, 104, 202232.Google Scholar
Ron, T. (1996) Who is responsible for fission in a free-ranging troop of baboons? Ethology, 102, 128133.Google Scholar
Rowell, T. E. (1993) Reification of social systems. Evolutionary Anthropology, 2(4), 135137.Google Scholar
Rubenstein, D. R. & Lovette, I. J. (2009) Reproductive skew and selection on female ornamentation in social species. Nature, 462, 786789.Google Scholar
Ruckstuhl, K. E. & Neuhaus, P. (2002) Sexual segregation in ungulates: A comparative test of three hypotheses. Biological Reviews, 77, 7796.Google Scholar
Sapolsky, R. M. (2004) Social status and health in humans and other animals. Annual Review of Anthropology, 33, 393418.Google Scholar
Sawaguchi, T. (1990) Relative brain size, stratification, and social structure in anthropoids. Primates, 31, 257272.Google Scholar
Sawaguchi, T. and Kudo, H. (1990) Neocortical development and social structure in primates. Primates, 31(2), 283289.Google Scholar
Schülke, O. & Kappeler, P. M. (2003) So near and yet so far: Territorial pairs but low cohesion between pair-partners in a nocturnal lemur, Phaner furcifer. Animal Behaviour, 65, 331343.Google Scholar
Schülke, O., & Ostner, J. (2005) Big times for dwarfs: Social organization, sexual selection, and cooperation in the Cheirogaleidae. Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews, 14, 170185.Google Scholar
Schülke, O. & Ostner, J. (2012) Ecological and social influences on sociality. In: Mitani, J. C., Call, J., Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A. and Silk, J. B. (eds.) The Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 195219.Google Scholar
Schülke, O., Kappeler, P. M., & Zischler, H. (2004) Small testes size despite high extra-pair paternity in the pair-living nocturnal primate Phaner furcifer. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 55, 293301Google Scholar
Schülke, O., Wenzel, S., & Ostner, J. (2013) Paternal relatedness predicts the strength of social bonds among female rhesus macaques. PLoS One, 8, e59789.Google Scholar
Schwensow, N., Fietz, J., Dausmann, K. H., & Sommer, S. (2008a) MHC-associated mating strategies and the importance of overall genetic diversity in an obligate pair-living primate. Evolutionary Ecology, 22, 617636.Google Scholar
Schwensow, N., Eberle, M., & Sommer, S. (2008b) Compatibility counts: MHC-associated mate choice in a wild promiscuous primate. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 275, 555564.Google Scholar
Setchell, J. M. & Huchard, E. (2010) The hidden benefits of sex: Evidence for MHC-associated mate choice in primate societies. BioEssays, 32, 940948.Google Scholar
Snaith, T. V. & Chapman, C. A. (2007) Primate group size and interpreting socioecological models: Do folivores really play by different rules? Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews, 16, 94106.Google Scholar
Seyfarth, R. M. & Cheney, D. L. (2012) Knowledge of social relations. In: Mitani, J. C., Call, J., Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A., & Silk, J. B. (eds.) The Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 628642.Google Scholar
Shattuck, M. R. & Williams, S. A. (2010) Arboreality has allowed for the evolution of increased longevity in mammals. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107, 46354639.Google Scholar
Shimada, M. K. (2000) Geographic distribution of mitochondrial DNA variations among grivet (Cercopithecus aethiops aethiops) populations in central Ethiopia. International Journal of Primatology, 21, 113129.Google Scholar
Shultz, S. & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2007) The evolution of the social brain: Anthropoid primates contrast with other vertebrates. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 274, 24292436.Google Scholar
Shultz, S., Opie, C., & Atkinson, Q. D. (2011) Stepwise evolution of stable sociality in primates. Nature, 479, 219222.Google Scholar
Silk, J. B. (1999) Male bonnet macaques use information about third-party rank relationships to recruit allies. Animal Behaviour, 58, 551.Google Scholar
Silk, J. B. (2012) The adaptive value of sociality. In: Mitani, J. C., Call, J., Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A., & Silk, J. B. (eds.) The Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 552564.Google Scholar
Silk, J. B., Altmann, J., & Alberts, S. C. (2006) Social relationships among adult female baboons (Papio cynocephalus) I. Variation in the strength of social bonds. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 61, 183195.Google Scholar
Slocombe, K. E. & Zuberbühler, K. (2007) Chimpanzees modify recruitment screams as a function of audience composition. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 104, 1722817233.Google Scholar
Smith, K. L., Alberts, S. C., & Altmann, J. (2003) Wild female baboons bias their social behaviour towards paternal half-sisters. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 270, 503510.Google Scholar
Snyder-Mackler, N., Alberts, S. C., & Bergman, T. J. (2012) Concessions of an alpha male? Cooperative defence and shared reproduction in multi–male primate groups. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 279, 37883795.Google Scholar
Stanford, C. B. (1998) Predation and male bonds in primate societies. Behaviour, 135, 513533.Google Scholar
Sterck, E. H. M., Watts, D. P., & van Schaik, C. P. (1997) The evolution of female social relationships in nonhuman primates. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 41, 291309.Google Scholar
Stojan-Dolar, M. & Heymann, E. W. (2010) Vigilance of mustached tamarins in single-species and mixed–species groups: The influence of group composition. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 64, 325335.Google Scholar
Strier, K. B., Chaves, P. B., Mendes, S. L., Fagundes, V., & Di Fiore, A. (2011) Low paternity skew and the influence of maternal kin in an egalitarian, patrilocal primate. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108, 1891518919.Google Scholar
Sueur, C., Jacobs, A., Amblard, F., Petit, O., & King, A. J. (2011) How can social network analysis improve the study of primate behavior? American Journal of Primatology, 73, 703719.Google Scholar
Swedell, L. (2012) Primate sociality and social systems. Nature Education Knowledge, 3, e84.Google Scholar
Tan, C. L. (1999) Group composition, home range size, and diet of three sympatric bamboo lemur species (genus Hapalemur) in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar. International Journal of Primatology, 20, 547566.Google Scholar
Teelen, S. (2008) Influence of chimpanzee predation on the red colobus population at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda. Primates, 49, 4149.Google Scholar
Teichroeb, J. A. & Sicotte, P. (2012) Cost-free vigilance during feeding in folivorous primates? Examining the effect of predation risk, scramble competition, and infanticide threat on vigilance in ursine colobus monkeys (Colobus vellerosus). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 66, 453466.Google Scholar
Terborgh, J. & Janson, C. H. (1986) The socioecology of primate groups. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 17, 111135.Google Scholar
Thierry, B. (2013) Identifying constraints in the evolution of primate societies. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 368, 20120342.Google Scholar
Thornton, A. & McAuliffe, K. (2006) Teaching in wild meerkats. Science, 313, 227229.Google Scholar
Van Horn, R. C., Buchan, J. C., Altmann, J., & Alberts, S. C. (2007) Divided destinies: Group choice by female savannah baboons during social group fission. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 61, 18231837.Google Scholar
van Noordwijk, M. A., Arora, N., Willems, E. P., et al. (2012) Female philopatry and its social benefits among Bornean orangutans. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 66, 823834.Google Scholar
van Schaik, C. P. (1983) Why are diurnal primates living in groups? Behaviour, 87, 120144.Google Scholar
van Schaik, C. P. (1989) The ecology of social relationships amongst female primates. In: Standen, V. and Foley, R. A. (eds.) Comparative Socioecology. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 195218.Google Scholar
van Schaik, C. P. & Hörstermann, M. (1994) Predation risk and the number of adult males in a primate group: A comparative test. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 35, 261272.Google Scholar
van Schaik, C. P. & Isler, K. (2012) Life–history evolution in primates. In: Mitani, J. C., Call, J., Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A., & Silk, J. B. (eds.) The Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 220244.Google Scholar
van Schaik, C. P. & Kappeler, P. M. (1997) Infanticide risk and the evolution of male–female association in primates. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 264, 16871694.Google Scholar
van Schaik, C. P. & Kappeler, P. M. (2003) The evolution of social monogamy in primates. In: Reichard, U. H. & Boesch, C. (eds.) Monogamy: Mating Strategies and Partnerships in Birds, Humans and Other Mammals. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 5980.Google Scholar
van Schaik, C. P. & van Noordwijk, M. A. (1985) Evolutionary effect of the absence of felids on the social organization of the macaques on the island of Simeulue (Macaca fascicularis, Miller 1903). Folia Primatologica, 44, 138147.Google Scholar
Vigilant, L., Hofreiter, M., Siedel, H., & Boesch, C. (2001) Paternity and relatedness in wild chimpanzee communities. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 98, 1289012895.Google Scholar
Walker, R., Burger, O., Wagner, J., & von Rueden, C.R. (2006) Evolution of brain size and juvenile periods in primates. Journal of Human Evolution, 51, 480489.Google Scholar
Weidt, A., Hofmann, S. E., & König, B. (2008) Not only mate choice matters: Fitness consequences of social partner choice in female house mice. Animal Behaviour, 75, 801808.Google Scholar
Whiten, A. (2012) Social learning, traditions, and culture. In: Mitani, J. C., Call, J., Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A., & Silk, J. B. (eds.) The Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 681699.Google Scholar
Widdig, A., Nürnberg, P., Krawczak, M., Streich, W. J., & Bercovitch, F. B. (2001) Paternal relatedness and age proximity regulate social relationships among adult female rhesus macaques. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 98, 1376913773.Google Scholar
Widdig, A., Nürnberg, P., Krawczak, M., Streich, W. J., & Bercovitch, F. B. (2002) Affiliation and aggression among adult female rhesus macaques: A genetic analysis of paternal cohorts. Behaviour, 139, 371391.Google Scholar
Widdig, A., Streich, W. J., Nürnberg, P., Croucher, P. J. P., Bercovitch, F. B., & Krawczak, M. (2006) Paternal kin bias in the agonistic interventions of adult female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 61, 205214.Google Scholar
Wimmer, B. & Kappeler, P. M. (2002) The effects of sexual selection and life history on the genetic structure of redfronted lemur, Eulemur fulvus rufus, groups. Animal Behaviour, 63, 557568.Google Scholar
Wimmer, B., Tautz, D., & Kappeler, P. M. (2002) The genetic population structure of the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), a basal primate from Madagascar. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 52, 166175.Google Scholar
Wittig, R. M. & Boesch, C. (2010) Receiving post-conflict affiliation from the enemy’s friend reconciles former opponents. PLoS One, 5, e13995.Google Scholar
Wrangham, R. W. (1980) An ecological model of female-bonded primate groups. Behaviour, 75, 262300.Google Scholar
Yamagiwa, J., Kahekwa, J., & Basabose, A. (2003) Intra-specific variation in social organization of gorillas: Implications for their social evolution. Primates, 44, 359369.Google Scholar
Zuberbühler, K. (2012) Communication strategies. In: Mitani, J. C., Call, J., Kappeler, P. M., Palombit, R. A., & Silk, J. B. (eds.) The Evolution of Primate Societies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 643663.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×