Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-h5t46 Total loading time: 0.759 Render date: 2022-06-25T06:17:35.680Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Case 14 - Recognizing the Right Signs of Memory Impairment

from Part 3 - Missing Important Clues in the History

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2020

Keith Josephs
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
Federico Rodriguez-Porcel
Affiliation:
Medical University of South Carolina
Rhonna Shatz
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
Daniel Weintraub
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Alberto Espay
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
Get access

Summary

This 67-year-old right-handed woman presented with a 3-year history of memory problems. Her husband reported that she first had difficulty recognizing people, including close family members, such as grandchildren. He also reported she struggled to understand the meaning of words. As an example, she did not cook from recipes anymore, as she could not recognize the ingredients by their names. She had become repetitive and forgetful of recent conversations. However, she was still able to do her own finances, manage medications, and take care of most household chores. A year before her evaluation, her Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score was 20/30 due to impairments in clock drawing, naming, phonemic fluency, abstraction, and delayed recall (she did not recall any words freely and recognized four when multiple choices were given). Neuropsychological evaluation revealed predominant language impairment, and brain MRI showed bilateral temporal atrophy (see Figure 14.1). Her presentation was interpreted as early-onset Alzheimer disease, and she was started on donepezil and, later, memantine.

Type
Chapter
Information
Common Pitfalls in Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 42 - 44
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Gorno-Tempini, M. L. et al. 2011. Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants. Neurology 76(11) 10061014.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hodges, J. R. and Patterson, K. 2007. Semantic dementia: a unique clinicopathological syndrome. Lancet Neurol 6(11) 10041014.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Josephs, K. A. et al. 2008. The anatomic correlate of prosopagnosia in semantic dementia. Neurology 71(20) 16281633.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Josephs, K. A. et al. 2009. Two distinct subtypes of right temporal variant frontotemporal dementia. Neurology 73(18) 14431450.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kamminga, J. et al. 2015. Differentiating between right-lateralised semantic dementia and behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia: an examination of clinical characteristics and emotion processing. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 86(10) 10821088.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Olney, N. T., Spina, S. and Miller, B. L. 2017. Frontotemporal dementia. Neurol Clin 35(2) 339374.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rosen, H. J. et al. 2002. Emotion comprehension in the temporal variant of frontotemporal dementia. Brain 125(10) 22862295.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Seeley, W. W. et al. 2005. The natural history of temporal variant frontotemporal dementia. Neurology 64(8) 13841390.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×