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17 - The Signaling (or Cueing) Principle in Multimedia Learning

from Part IV - Principles for Reducing Extraneous Processing in Multimedia Learning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2021

Richard E. Mayer
Affiliation:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Logan Fiorella
Affiliation:
University of Georgia
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Summary

The signaling principle, also known as cueing principle, refers to the finding that people learn more deeply from a multimedia message when cues are added that guide attention to the relevant elements of the material or highlight the organization of the essential material. In this chapter, the main findings from research on signaling or cueing in multimedia learning are reviewed, addressing the effects of incorporating cues in the text, the picture, or both. In addition, the design of cues based on successful students’ eye movements and the effects of using experts’ or students’ eye movements as cues are discussed. This chapter shows that various types of cueing can have beneficial effects on learning and discusses potential boundary conditions.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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