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Introduction

from Part XVII - Shakespeare as Cultural Icon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2019

Bruce R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Katherine Rowe
Affiliation:
Smith College, Massachusetts
Ton Hoenselaars
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Akiko Kusunoki
Affiliation:
Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, Japan
Andrew Murphy
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Aimara da Cunha Resende
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

Sources cited

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Further reading

Bove, Paul A. ed. Edward Said and the Work of the Critic: Speaking Truth to Power. Durham: Duke UP, 2000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Foakes, Reginald. Coleridge on Shakespeare: The Text of the Lectures, 1811–1812. London: Routledge, 1971.Google Scholar
Kott, Jan. Shakespeare Our Contemporary. New York: Doubleday, 1964.Google Scholar
Poole, Adrian. Shakespeare and the Victorians: Arden Critical Companion. London: Arden Shakespeare, 2004.Google Scholar
Rabinow, Paul, ed. The Foucault Reader. New York: Pantheon Books, 1984.Google Scholar
Singh, Jyotsna. “The Location of Shakespeare: Afterword.” Native Shakespeares: Indigenous Appropriations on a Global Stage. Ed. Dionne, Craig and Kapadia, Parmita. Burlington: Ashgate, 2008. 231–39.Google Scholar
Tofteland, Curt L., and Cobb, Hal. “Prospero Behind Bars.” Shakespeare Survey 65 (November 2012): 429–44.Google Scholar

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