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Chapter 6 - Intervention Strategies for Schema Healing 1

Limited Reparenting

from Part II - The Model of Schema Therapy in Practice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2023

Robert N. Brockman
Affiliation:
Australian Catholic University
Susan Simpson
Affiliation:
NHS Forth Valley and University of South Australia
Christopher Hayes
Affiliation:
Schema Therapy Institute Australia
Remco van der Wijngaart
Affiliation:
International Society of Schema Therapy
Matthew Smout
Affiliation:
University of South Australia
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Summary

Limited reparenting is a cornerstone of schema therapy. It is a style of interacting with clients in which the therapist aims to give the client experiences of having their emotional needs met directly within the therapeutic relationship. The therapist here serves as a ‘healthy model’ or template of caring, self-control, and guidance that, over time, is internalised by the client into their own ‘Healthy Adult’ mode. The core ingredients of limited reparenting include offering care, guidance, empathic confrontation, and limit setting. The aim of this therapeutic relationship is to provide corrective experiences that ‘kick start’ the emotional development of the client. Based on a thorough assessment and conceptualisation, limited reparenting offers a specific roadmap to harnessing the power of the therapeutic alliance to promote schema change.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

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