Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-sh8wx Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-19T02:00:49.258Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

W

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Ian A. McFarland
Affiliation:
Emory University's Candler School of Theology
David A. S. Fergusson
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Karen Kilby
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham
Iain R. Torrance
Affiliation:
University of Aberdeen
Ian A. McFarland
Affiliation:
Emory University, Atlanta
David A. S. Fergusson
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Karen Kilby
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham
Iain R. Torrance
Affiliation:
Princeton Theological Seminary
Get access

Summary

War: see Just War.

Weil, Simone Simone Weil (1909–43), born into a freethinking Jewish family in Paris, was one of the first women graduates of the École Normale Supérieure. Throughout her life she was attentive to society's marginalized. Her writing addressed a variety of topics, including Greek philosophy, K. Marx (1818–83), Christianity, the Bhagavad Gita, literature, science, mathematics, politics, and ethics. Like Marx, she sought to reconnect theory and praxis by developing a philosophy of work. This commitment shows in her activities: teaching, working for a year in a factory, supporting French labour organizations and the unemployed, attempting to fight in the Spanish Civil War and working with the French Resistance in London, where she died in 1943.

Locating herself on the border of all things Christian and non-Christian, Weil simultaneously criticized and embraced the religion. Her critique was levelled at institutionalized Christianity, the church, and its collusion with any form of empire (whether fourth-century Rome or twentieth-century France), that produced a theology that excluded any others – whether religions, beliefs, cultures, or ideas. Weil embraced a unique version of Christianity, emphasizing inclusion, contemplation, renunciation, and truth. She saw Christ as revelatory, but not unique: incarnation occurs before and after Jesus, from the beginning of creation when ‘the Word was with God’ (John 1:1). The import of Christ is his decreative, or renunciatory, stance. He gives up his life in order to (1) attend to the least among us, (2) criticize institutional power, and (3) reveal the supernatural use of suffering.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Weil, S., Waiting for God (Perennial classics, 2001).Google Scholar
Heitzenrater, R. P., John Wesley and the People Called Methodists (Abingdon Press, 1991).Google Scholar
Rack, H. D., Reasonable Enthusiast: John Wesley and the Rise of Methodism, 3rd edn (Epworth, 2002).Google Scholar
Gunter, W. S.et al., Wesley and the Quadrilateral: Renewing the Conversation (Abingdon Press, 1997).Google Scholar
Ford, D., Christian Wisdom: Desiring God and Learning in Love (Cambridge University Press, 2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Treier, D., Virtue and the Voice of God: Toward Theology as Wisdom (Eerdmans, 2006).Google Scholar
Cannon, K. G., Katie's Canon: Womanism and the Soul of the Black Community (Continuum, 1995).Google Scholar
Floyd-Thomas, S. M., ed., Deeper Shades of Purple: Womanism in Religion and Society (New York University Press, 2006).Google Scholar
Gilkes, C., ‘If it wasn't for the women – ’: Black Women's Experience and Womanist Culture in Church and Community (Orbis, 2001).Google Scholar
Mitchem, S., Introducing Womanist Theology (Orbis, 2002).Google Scholar
Elderen, M., Introducing the World Council of Churches (WCC, 1990).Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×