Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-7d684dbfc8-w65q4 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2023-09-25T11:04:16.857Z Has data issue: false Feature Flags: { "corePageComponentGetUserInfoFromSharedSession": true, "coreDisableEcommerce": false, "coreDisableSocialShare": false, "coreDisableEcommerceForArticlePurchase": false, "coreDisableEcommerceForBookPurchase": false, "coreDisableEcommerceForElementPurchase": false, "coreUseNewShare": true, "useRatesEcommerce": true } hasContentIssue false

8 - On Churchill and terror

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2010

Elaine Aston
Affiliation:
Lancaster University
Elin Diamond
Affiliation:
Rutgers University, New Jersey
Get access

Summary

Of all the jingoistic terms characterizing recent US foreign policy, the 'war on terror' has endured, not only because it refers to the unprovoked bombing of Baghdad on 19 March 2003, which led to a brutal and ongoing war, but because it is such an elusive and strange idea. At first it seemed that this was typical 'Bush-speak': meaning 'terrorism', the former president loosely and inaccurately said 'terror'. Yet the OED states that the provenance of 'terrorism' is the 'system of terror' introduced in the French Revolution, and that 'terror' derives from the far older Latin terrorum or 'the state of being terrified or greatly frightened'. Can war be waged on a system of terror and on the affective state of being terrified? Isn't war the cause of terror? Or is terror what feeds war? And what of terror when no war is in view? Since her earliest radio plays, Caryl Churchill has explored these questions, not as ancillary to but as deeply rooted in her work. She dramatizes a provocative slippage between terrorist act and terrorized affect and invites us to discern in her theatre a unique dramaturgy of terror, a shifting aggregate of formal decisions based on the media she writes for and the times she has lived, and is living, through. 'On Churchill and terror' will trace a long arc of representative plays, from The Ants (1962) and Objections to Sex and Violence (1975), to Softcops (1978), A Mouthful of Birds (1986), Thyestes (1994) and Far Away (2000) in order to map the key coordinates of Churchill's career-long concern with both systems and affect, with terrorism and terror.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×