Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-82ts8 Total loading time: 0.38 Render date: 2022-07-01T05:30:23.578Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

5 - Cognitive behavioral therapy interventions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

Craig A. Macneil
Affiliation:
ORYGEN Youth Health, University of Melbourne
Melissa K. Hasty
Affiliation:
ORYGEN Youth Health, University of Melbourne
Philippe Conus
Affiliation:
Université de Lausanne, Switzerland
Michael Berk
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne
Jan Scott
Affiliation:
University of Newcastle, New South Wales
Get access

Summary

What we are today comes from our thoughts of yesterday, and our present thoughts build our life of tomorrow: Our life is the creation of our mind.

Buddha, in Haidt (2006, p. 23)

Introduction

As described in Chapter 1, a significant evidence base is emerging to support the application of CBT and other structured psychological interventions in the treatment of bipolar disorder. In a number of randomized controlled trials, CBT has been shown to decrease the duration of acute depressive episodes, extend the time between relapses, reduce hospitalization rates, and improve medication adherence and psychosocial functioning (for reviews see Huxley et al., 2000; Scott & Colom, 2005; Beynon et al., 2008). In addition, targeting prodromal cognitive changes, such as referential beliefs, has been found to increase the likelihood of successful outcomes in people with bipolar disorder (see review by Goldberg et al., 2005).

The focus of this chapter will be on the clinical application of selected cognitive behavioral techniques that we have noted to be particularly useful when working with young people with bipolar disorder.

CBT for young people with bipolar disorder: a phase-specific intervention

People require different elements of a cognitive behavioral intervention depending on their phase of the disorder. Specifically, in the acute phase, the emphasis tends to be on managing behavioral issues and risk reduction, including reducing stimuli if the person is manic or hypomanic, or increasing stimuli if depressed.

Type
Chapter
Information
Bipolar Disorder in Young People
A Psychological Intervention Manual
, pp. 65 - 97
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×