Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-cjp7w Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-23T19:21:55.736Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

CHAPTER 4 - ‘Piety from the Ploughsoil: Religion in Roman Norfolk through Recent Metal-Detector Finds’

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2013

T. A. Heslop
Affiliation:
University of East Anglia
Elizabeth Mellings
Affiliation:
University of East Anglia
Margit Thøfner
Affiliation:
University of East Anglia
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION

The religious practices of Roman Britain and the Roman Empire in general have been the subject of many learned books and papers. It is not the intention of this small study to do anything more than consider some of the various categories of material recovered from Norfolk in the last three decades or so, and what that material may tell us about the various gods and goddesses worshipped in Roman Norfolk and the way in which they were revered.

There are practically no inscriptions on stone from the county, which is not surprising given the paucity of anything but flint in the area, and so artefacts recovered with the aid of metal detectors are of particular importance. The objects with which this paper is concerned, discovered as they have been in ploughsoil, have no archaeological context. Thus, there is no evidence for the way in which they were deposited. Nonetheless, these objects can in themselves tell a great deal about religious beliefs in Norfolk during the period of the Roman Empire. Since it stands to reason that objects with a religious function would have been used at religious sites, their discovery can also be used to answer the question of how many such sites existed in Roman Norfolk. It is very unlikely that these objects were casually lost or thrown away. Rather their context is, in the vast majority of cases, votive in nature; these were gifts to the gods that remain to offer mute testimony to the religious beliefs of the people who offered them.

Type
Chapter
Information
Art, Faith and Place in East Anglia
From Prehistory to the Present
, pp. 50 - 65
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×