Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-8448b6f56d-c47g7 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-23T04:18:59.562Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

11 - Axis II and anxiety disorders

from Section 2 - Challenges in diagnosing pathological anxiety

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2010

Helen Blair Simpson
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Yuval Neria
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Roberto Lewis-Fernández
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Franklin Schneier
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Get access

Summary

This chapter addresses the complex inter relationships between anxiety disorders (ADs) and personality disorders (PDs), including diagnostic controversies, patterns of comorbidity, and prognostic implications for treatment. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) created five axes for diagnostic classification, including Axis I for illnesses such as ADs and Axis II for PDs. The presence of an Axis I state disorder may confound diagnosis of Axis II trait. The biopsychosocial model suggests that illness arises from the interplay of genetic, trait, and environmental influences. PDs are less prevalent than ADs. Limited information exists on the comorbidity between ADs and PDs in the general population. Available data suggest that PD comorbidity among ADs is common, except in the case of specific phobia. Current evidence yields more questions than answers, due in part to the complexity of assessing PDs and the labor and expense of large-scale, longitudinal studies.
Type
Chapter
Information
Anxiety Disorders
Theory, Research and Clinical Perspectives
, pp. 116 - 126
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×