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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2018

G. Richard Scott
Affiliation:
University of Nevada, Reno
Christy G. Turner II
Affiliation:
Arizona State University
Grant C. Townsend
Affiliation:
University of Adelaide
María Martinón-Torres
Affiliation:
University College London
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Chapter
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The Anthropology of Modern Human Teeth
Dental Morphology and Its Variation in Recent and Fossil <I>Homo sapien</I>
, pp. 337 - 386
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

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