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9 - Hard Look Review

from Part III - The Law of Public Administration

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 October 2020

Elizabeth Fisher
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Sidney A. Shapiro
Affiliation:
Wake Forest University, North Carolina
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Summary

In 1974, Harold Leventhal, a judge of the District of Columbia (DC) Circuit of the Federal Court of Appeals, wrote that “[t]he law of the environment now seems suddenly ablaze, a development which has taken place essentially within the last five years.”1 As seen in Chapter 7, the subject of Leventhal’s comment was the legislation that had been passed in those five years because it required “administrative implementation through rules and orders rooted in technical expertise and inquiry.”2 It was not just that, however. As also seen in Chapter 7, there were calls for more responsive government – government that fulfilled the democratic wishes of the American people.3

Type
Chapter
Information
Administrative Competence
Reimagining Administrative Law
, pp. 246 - 273
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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