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Section V - Cervical Cancer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 July 2023

Dennis S. Chi
Affiliation:
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York
Nisha Lakhi
Affiliation:
Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island
Nicoletta Colombo
Affiliation:
University of Milan-Bicocca
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

References

Ramirez, PT, et al. minimally invasive versus abdominal radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer. N Engl J Med 2018;379(20):18951904.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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References

Ramirez, PT, et al. Minimally invasive versus abdominal radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer. N Engl J Med 2018;379:1895–1904.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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References

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References

National Comprehensive Cancer Network. NCCN guidelines in oncology: cervical cancer. Available at: www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/cervical.pdf. Retrieved September 11, 2020.Google Scholar
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Sia, TY, et al. Trends in use and effect on survival of simple hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer. Obstet Gynecol 2019;134:11321143.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Li, X, et al. Simple conization and pelvic lymphadenectomy in early-stage cervical cancer: a retrospective analysis and review of the literature. Gynecol Oncol 2020;158(2):231235. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2020.05.035CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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References

Roy, M, et al. Pregnancies after radical vaginal trachelectomy for early-stage cervical cancer, Am J Obstet Gynecol 1998;179:14911496.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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References

Fokom Domgue, J, et al. Conservative management of cervical cancer: current status and obstetrical implications. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol 2019;55:7992.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Plante, M, et al. FIGO 2018 stage IB2 (2–4 cm) cervical cancer treated with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by fertility sparing surgery (CONTESSA); neoadjuvant chemotherapy and conservative surgery in cervical cancer to preserve fertility (NEOCON-F). Int J Gynecol Cancer 2019;29:969975.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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References

Yang, J, et al. Completion hysterectomy after chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced adeno-type cervical carcinoma: updated survival outcomes and experience in post radiation surgery. J Gynecol Oncol 2020;31(2):e16.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Keys, HM, et al. Radiation therapy with and without extrafascial hysterectomy for bulky stage IB cervical carcinoma: a randomized trial of the Gynecologic Oncology Group. Gynecol Oncol 2003;89(3):343353.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Morice, P, et al. Results of the GYNECO 02 study, an FNCLCC phase III trial comparing hysterectomy with no hysterectomy in patients with a (clinical and radiological) complete response after chemoradiation therapy for stage IB2 or II cervical cancer. Oncologist 2012;17(1):6471.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cetina, L, et al. Brachytherapy versus radical hysterectomy after external beam chemoradiation with gemcitabine plus cisplatin: a randomized, phase III study in IB2-IIB cervical cancer patients. Ann Oncol 2013;24(8):20432047.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shim, SH, et al. Impact of adjuvant hysterectomy on prognosis in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy: a meta-analysis. J Gynecol Oncol 2018;29(2):e25.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lu, W, et al. Chemoradiotherapy alone vs. chemoradiotherapy and hysterectomy for locally advanced cervical cancer: a systematic review and updated meta-analysis. Oncol Lett 2021;21(2):160.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yang, J, et al. Extrafascial hysterectomy after concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced cervical adenocarcinoma. J Gynecol Oncol 2016;27(4):e40.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

References

Keys, HM, et al. Cisplatin, radiation and adjuvant hysterectomy compared with radiation and adjuvant hysterectomy for bulky stage Ib cervical carcinoma. N Engl J Med 1999;341:708.Google Scholar
Chargari, C, et al. Brachytherapy: an overview for clinicians. CA Cancer J Clin 2019;69:386401.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Touboul, C, et al. Prognostic factors and morbidities after completion surgery in patients undergoing initial chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer. Oncologist 2010;15:405415.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Keys, HM, et al. Gynecologic Oncology Group. Radiation therapy with and without extrafascial hysterectomy for bulky stage IB cervical carcinoma: a randomized trial of the Gynecologic Oncology Group. Gynecol Oncol 2003;89:343353.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Morice, P, et al. Results of the GYNECO O2/108 phase III trial. Results of the GYNECO 02 study, an FNCLCC phase III trial comparing hysterectomy with no hysterectomy in patients with a (clinical and radiological) complete response after chemoradiation therapy for stage IB2 or II cervical cancer. Oncologist 2012;17:6471.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cetina, L, et al. Brachytherapy versus radical hysterectomy after external beam chemoradiation with gemcitabine plus cisplatin: a randomized, phase III study in IB2-IIB cervical cancer patients. Ann Oncol 2013;24:20432047.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

References

Tierney, J. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data from 21 randomised trials. Eur J Cancer 2003;39:24702486.Google Scholar
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Salihi, R, et al. Neoadjuvant weekly paclitaxel-carboplatin is effective in stage I–II cervical cancer. Int J Gynecol Cancer 2017;27(6):12561260.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

References

Chemoradiotherapy for Cervical Cancer Meta-Analysis Collaboration. Reducing uncertainties about the effects of chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data from 18 randomized trials. J Clin Oncol 2008;26:58025812.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Gupta, S, et al. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical surgery versus concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with stage IB2, IIA, or IIB squamous cervical cancer: a randomized controlled trial. J Clin Oncol 2018;36(16):15481555.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kenter, G, et al. Results from neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery compared to chemoradiation for stage Ib2–IIb cervical cancer, EORTC 55994. 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting; May 31 to June 4, 2019; Chicago, IL: American Society of Clinical Oncology. Abstract 5503.Google Scholar
Tan, LT, et al. Image-guided adaptive radiotherapy in cervical cancer. Semin Radiat Oncol 2019;29(3):284298.Google Scholar

References

Chung, HC, et al. Efficacy and safety of pembrolizumab in previously treated advanced cervical cancer: results from the phase II KEYNOTE-158 study. J Clin Oncol 2019;37:14701478.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Naumann, RW, et al. Safety and efficacy of nivolumab monotherapy in recurrent or metastatic cervical, vaginal, or vulvar carcinoma: results from the phase I/II Check Mate 358 Trial. J Clin Oncol 2019;37:28252834.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Trimble, CL, et al. Safety, efficacy, and immunogenicity of VGX-3100, a therapeutic synthetic DNA vaccine targeting human papillomavirus 16 and 18 E6 and E7 proteins for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2b trial. Lancet 2015;386:20782088.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stevanovic, S, et al. Complete regression of metastatic cervical cancer after treatment with human papillomavirus-targeted tumor-infiltrating T cells. J Clin Oncol 2015;33:15431550.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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References

Lheureux, S, et al. Association of ipilimumab with safety and antitumor activity in women with metastatic or recurrent human papillomavirus–related cervical carcinoma. JAMA Oncol 2018;4(7):e173776.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chung, HC, et al. Efficacy and safety of pembrolizumab in previously treated advanced cervical cancer: results from the phase II KEYNOTE-158 study. J Clin Oncol 2019;37(17):14701478.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Frenel, J-S, et al. Safety and efficacy of pembrolizumab in advanced, programmed death ligand 1–positive cervical cancer: results from the phase Ib KEYNOTE-028 Trial. J Clin Oncol 2017;35(36):40354041.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boussios, S, et al. Management of patients with recurrent/advanced cervical cancer beyond first line platinum regimens: where do we stand? A literature review. Crit Rev Oncol/Hematol 2016;108:164174.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Naumann, RW, et al. Safety and efficacy of nivolumab monotherapy in recurrent or metastatic cervical, vaginal, or vulvar carcinoma: results from the phase I/II CheckMate 358 Trial. J Clin Oncol 2019;37(31):28252834.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Naumann, RW, et al. Efficacy and safety of nivolumab plus ipilimumab in patients with recurrent /metastatic cervical cancer: results from Checkmate 358. Ann Oncol 2019;30 (Suppl. 5):v851v934.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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  • Cervical Cancer
  • Edited by Dennis S. Chi, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, Nisha Lakhi, Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, Nicoletta Colombo, University of Milan-Bicocca
  • Book: 50 Big Debates in Gynecologic Oncology
  • Online publication: 20 July 2023
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  • Cervical Cancer
  • Edited by Dennis S. Chi, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, Nisha Lakhi, Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, Nicoletta Colombo, University of Milan-Bicocca
  • Book: 50 Big Debates in Gynecologic Oncology
  • Online publication: 20 July 2023
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Cervical Cancer
  • Edited by Dennis S. Chi, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, Nisha Lakhi, Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, Nicoletta Colombo, University of Milan-Bicocca
  • Book: 50 Big Debates in Gynecologic Oncology
  • Online publication: 20 July 2023
Available formats
×