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Regulation of embryonic size in early mouse development in vitro culture system

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 January 2013

Tomoka Hisaki
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Applied Genetics, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113–8657, Japan.
Ikuma Kawai
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Applied Genetics, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113–8657, Japan.
Koji Sugiura
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Applied Genetics, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113–8657, Japan.
Kunihiko Naito
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Applied Genetics, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113–8657, Japan.
Kiyoshi Kano*
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Joint-Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753–8515, Japan. Biomedical Science Center for Translational Research (BSCTR), United Graduate School of Veterinary Science, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753–8515, Japan.
*
All correspondence to: Kiyoshi Kano. Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Joint-Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753–8515, Japan. e-mail: kanokiyo@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

Summary

Mammals self-regulate their body size throughout development. In the uterus, embryos are properly regulated to be a specific size at birth. Previously, size and cell number in aggregated embryos, which were made from two or more morulae, and half embryos, which were halved at the 2-cell stage, have been analysed in vivo in preimplantation and post-implantation development in mice. Here, we examined whether or not the mouse embryo has the capacity to self-regulate growth using an in vitro culture system. To elucidate embryonic histology, cells were counted in aggregated or half embryos in comparison with control embryos. Both double- and triple-aggregated embryos contained more cells than did control embryos during all culture periods, and the relative growth ratios showed no growth inhibition in an in vitro culture system. Meanwhile, half embryos contained fewer cells than control embryos, but the number grew throughout the culture period. Our data suggest that the growth of aggregated embryos is not affected and continues in an in vitro culture system. On the other hand, the growth of half embryos accelerates and continues in an in vitro culture system. This situation, in turn, implied that post-implantation mouse embryos might have some potential to regulate their own growth and size as seen by using an in vitro culture system without uterus factors. In conclusion, our results indicated that embryos have some ways in which to regulate their own size in mouse early development.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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