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Article contents

Development of rat tetraploid and chimeric embryos aggregated with diploid cells

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 November 2006

T. Shinozawa
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Reproduction, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
A. Sugawara
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Reproduction, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
A. Matsumoto
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Reproduction, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
Y-J. Han
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Reproduction, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
I. Tomioka
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Reproduction, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
K. Inai
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Reproduction, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
H. Sasada
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Reproduction, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
E. Kobayashi
Affiliation:
Division of Organ Replacement Research, Center for Molecular Medicine, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi, Japan.
H. Matsumoto*
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Reproduction, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi, Japan.
E. Sato
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Reproduction, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
*
All correspondence to: H Matsumoto. Laboratory of Breeding and Reproduction, Division of Animal Science, Department of Bioproductive Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, 350 Mine-machi, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505, Japan. Tel: +81 28649 5432. Fax: +81 28649 5431. e-mail: matsu@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp

Summary

In the present study, we examined the preimplantation and postimplantation development of rat tetraploid embryos produced by electrofusion of 2-cell-stage embryos. Developmental rate of tetraploid embryos to morula or blastocyst stage was 93% (56/60) and similar to that found in diploid embryos (95%, 55/58). After embryo transfer, rat tetraploid embryos showed implantation and survived until day 8 of pregnancy, however the conceptuses were aberrant on day 9. In mouse, tetraploid embryos have the ability to support the development of blastomeres that cannot develop independently. As shown in the present study, a pair of diploid blastomeres from the rat 8-cell-stage embryo degenerated immediately after implantation. Therefore, we examined whether rat tetraploid embryos have the ability to support the development of 2/8 blastomeres. We produced chimeric rat embryos in which a pair of diploid blastomeres from an 8-cell-stage green fluorescent protein negative (GFP−) embryo was aggregated with three tetraploid blastomeres from 4-cell GFP-positive (GFP+) embryos. The developmental rate of rat 2n(GFP−) ↔ 4n(GFP+) embryos to the morula or blastocyst stages was 93% (109/117) and was similar to that found for 2n(GFP−) ↔ 2n(GFP+) embryos (100%, 51/51). After embryo transfer, 2n(GFP−) ↔ 4n(GFP+) conceptuses were examined on day 14 of pregnancy, the developmental rate to fetus was quite low (4%, 4/109) and they were all aberrant and smaller than 2n(GFP−) ↔ 2n(GFP+) conceptuses, whereas immunohistochemical analysis showed no staining for GFP in fetuses. Our results suggest that rat tetraploid embryos are able to prolong the development of diploid blastomeres that cannot develop independently, although postimplantation development was incomplete.

Type
Research Article
Information
Zygote , Volume 14 , Issue 4 , November 2006 , pp. 287 - 297
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006

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