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Efficiency optimization of a three-coil resonant energy link

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 December 2019

Giuseppina Monti*
Affiliation:
Department of Innovation for Engineering, University of Salento, via per Monteroni snc, 73100, Lecce, Italy
Maria V. De Paolis
Affiliation:
Department of Innovation for Engineering, University of Salento, via per Monteroni snc, 73100, Lecce, Italy
Laura Corchia
Affiliation:
Department of Innovation for Engineering, University of Salento, via per Monteroni snc, 73100, Lecce, Italy
Apostolos Georgiadis
Affiliation:
Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, UK
Luciano Tarricone
Affiliation:
Department of Innovation for Engineering, University of Salento, via per Monteroni snc, 73100, Lecce, Italy
*Corresponding
Author for correspondence: Giuseppina Monti, Department of Innovation for Engineering, University of Salento, via per Monteroni snc, 73100, Lecce, Italy. E-mail: giuseppina.monti@unisalento.it

Abstract

This paper presents an effective and time saving procedure for designing a three-coil resonant inductive wireless power transfer (WPT) link. The proposed approach aims at optimizing the power transfer efficiency of the link for given constraints imposed by the specific application of interest. The WPT link is described as a two-port network with equivalent lumped elements analytically expressed as function of the geometrical parameters. This allows obtaining a closed-form expression of the efficiency that can be maximized by acting on the geometrical parameters of the link by using a general purpose optimization algorithm. The proposed design procedure allows rapidly finding the desired optimal solution while minimizing the computational efforts. Referring to the case of an application constraining the dimensions of the receiver, analytical data are validated through full-wave simulations and measurements.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019

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