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Application of wireless power transfer technologies and intermittent energy harvesting for wireless sensors in rotating machines

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 June 2016

Qingfeng Xia*
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PJ, UK. Phone: +44 1865 275 1680
Longyang Yan
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW, UK
*
Corresponding author: Q. Xia Email: qingfeng.xia@eng.ox.ac.uk; qingfeng.xia@gmail.com

Abstract

Battery-powered wireless sensor networks have been extensively deployed in condition monitoring and structural health monitoring systems, but the performance of wireless sensors are limited by battery capacity and difficulty of application in rotating machines. In this paper, a variety of commercial wireless charging solutions and coil-shaft configurations for magnetic coupling are compared, having in mind of the application of continuously charging wireless sensors on rotating machines. For the co-axial configuration of the transmitter coil and the receiver coil, a Qi standard compliant wireless charging kit and a custom charging circuit are successfully applied to charge wireless sensors on small rotating test rigs. In order to harvest and store intermittent energy input from the wireless power source, a prototype receiver circuit using a supercapacitor and low-dropout regulator is designed and validated. Based on the prototype circuit, the radial configuration of single transmitter coil and multiple receiver coils is demonstrated for wireless power transfer to the sensor nodes on the drivetrain of a small wind turbine test rig.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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