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Yield and Physiological Response of Nontransgenic Cotton to Simulated Glyphosate Drift

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Walter E. Thomas
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Ian C. Burke
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Bridget L. Robinson
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Wendy A. Pline-Srnić
Affiliation:
Syngenta, Jealotts Hill International Research Centre, Bracknell, Berkshire RG42 6EY, U.K.
Keith L. Edmisten
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Randy Wells
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
John W. Wilcut*
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: john_wilcut@ncsu.edu

Abstract

Field studies were conducted in 2001 in Lewiston, NC, and in 2002 at Clayton and Lewiston, NC, to investigate the response of nontransgenic cotton to simulated glyphosate drift in a weed-free environment. Nontransgenic cotton variety ‘Fibermax 989’ was planted in a conventional seedbed at all locations. Glyphosate treatments were applied early postemergence (EPOST) at the four-leaf growth stage of cotton at 0, 8.7, 17.5, 35, 70, 140, 280, 560, and 1,120 g ai/ha and represent 0, 0.78, 1.55, 3.13, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100% of the commercial use rate, respectively. Rates as low as 140 g/ha caused lint yield reductions depending on year and location. When averaged over all locations, lint yield reductions of 4, 49, 72, and 87% compared with nontreated cotton were observed with glyphosate rates of 140, 280, 560, and 1,120 g/ha, respectively. Visual injury and shikimic acid accumulation were evident at glyphosate rates greater or equal to 70 g/ha. Collectively, visual injury and shikimic acid accumulation at 7 d after EPOST treatment might be used as a diagnostic indicator to predict potential yield reductions from simulated glyphosate drift.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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