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Yellow Nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) Control in Tomato with Puccinia canaliculata and Pebulate

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

C. Edward Beste
Affiliation:
University of Maryland, Lower Eastern Shore Res. and Edu. Center/Salisbury Facility, Salisbury, MD 21801
J. Ray Frank
Affiliation:
USDA-ARS., Foreign Dis. Weed Sci. Res., Ft. Detrick, Frederick, MD 21702
William L. Bruckart
Affiliation:
USDA-ARS., Foreign Dis. Weed Sci. Res., Ft. Detrick, Frederick, MD 21702
Dennis R. Johnson
Affiliation:
USDA-ARS., Foreign Dis. Weed Sci. Res., Ft. Detrick, Frederick, MD 21702
William E. Potts
Affiliation:
University of Maryland/USDA Statistical Consulting Service, Beltsville, MD 20705

Abstract

Yellow nutsedge control with rust (Puccinia canaliculata (Schw.) Lagerh.) collected in Salisbury, MD., was evaluated alone or in combination with pebulate at 1.7 or 3.3 kg ai ha-1 in transplanted tomato. Foliar applications of urediniospores in mid-June did not affect the yellow nutsedge population; however, tuber biomass was reduced 32%. In July, yellow nutsedge infection was manifest as an increase of phytotoxicity from 2.3 to 4.1 (0 to 10) and of disease incidence increase from 3 to 37%. Pebulate, 3.3 kg ha-1 reduced the yellow nutsedge population and ground cover by 79 and 90%, respectively, in June, with a 48% reduction of both tuber population and biomass in September. Tomato yields were not increased by rust or pebulate treatments. Marketable tomato yield was increased 46% by handweeding. Yellow nutsedge control was not enhanced by the combination treatments of pebulate followed by rust inoculation.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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