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Tolerance of Sweetpotato to Herbicides Applied in Plant Propagation Beds

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 March 2019

Stephen C. Smith*
Affiliation:
Graduate Student, North Carolina State University, Department of Horticultural Science, Raleigh, NC, USA
Katherine M. Jennings
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, North Carolina State University, Department of Horticultural Science, Raleigh, NC, USA
David W. Monks
Affiliation:
Professor, North Carolina State University, Department of Horticultural Science, Raleigh, NC, USA
Jonathan R. Schultheis
Affiliation:
Professor, North Carolina State University, Department of Horticultural Science, Raleigh, NC, USA
S. Chris Reberg-Horton
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, North Carolina State University, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Stephen C. Smith, North Carolina State University, Department of Horticultural Science, 7609 Kilgore Hall, Raleigh NC 27695. (Email: scsmith7@ncsu.edu)

Abstract

Field and greenhouse studies were conducted in 2016 and 2017 to determine sweetpotato tolerance to herbicides applied to plant propagation beds. Herbicide treatments included PRE application of flumioxazin (107 g ai ha−1), S-metolachlor (800 g ai ha−1), fomesafen (280 g ai ha−1), flumioxazin plus S-metolachlor (107 g ai ha−1 + 800 g ai ha−1), fomesafen plus S-metolachlor (280 g ai ha−1 + 800 g ai ha−1), fluridone (1,120 or 2,240 g ai ha−1), fluridone plus S-metolachlor (1,120 g ai ha−1 + 800 g ai ha−1), napropamide (1,120 g ai ha−1), clomazone (420 g ai ha−1), linuron (560 g ai ha−1), linuron plus S-metolachlor (560 g ai ha−1 + 800 g ai ha−1), bicyclopyrone (38 or 49.7 g ai ha−1), pyroxasulfone (149 g ai ha−1), pre-mix of flumioxazin plus pyroxasulfone (81.8 g ai ha−1 + 104.2 g ai ha−1), or metribuzin (294 g ai ha−1). Paraquat plus non-ionic surfactant (280 g ai ha−1 + 0.25% v/v) POST was also included. After plants in the propagation bed were cut and sweetpotato slip number, length, and weight had been determined, the slips were then transplanted to containers and placed either in the greenhouse or on an outdoor pad to determine any effects from the herbicide treatments on initial sweetpotato growth. Sweetpotato slip number, length, and/or weight were affected by flumioxazin with or without S-metolachlor, S-metolachlor with or without fomesafen, clomazone, and all fluridone treatments. In the greenhouse studies, initial root growth of plants after transplanting was inhibited by fluridone (1,120 g ai ha−1) and fluridone plus S-metolachlor. However, by 5 wk after transplanting few differences were observed between treatments. Fomesafen, linuron with or without S-metolachlor, bicyclopyrone (38 or 49.7 g ai ha−1), pyroxasulfone with or without flumioxazin, metribuzin, and paraquat did not cause injury to sweetpotato slips in any of the studies conducted.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2019. 

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Footnotes

Cite this article: Smith SC, Jennings KM, Monks DW, Schultheis JR, Reberg-Horton SC. (2019) Tolerance of sweetpotato to herbicides applied in plant propagation beds. Weed Technol 33:147–152. doi: 10.1017/wet.2018.103

References

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