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Sweet Corn (Zea mays) Cultivar Tolerance to Application Timing of Nicosulfuron

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Darren K. Robinson
Affiliation:
Dep. Hortic. Sci. and Crop Sci., N. C. State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7609
David W. Monks
Affiliation:
Dep. Hortic. Sci. and Crop Sci., N. C. State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7609
Jonathan R. Schultheis
Affiliation:
Dep. Hortic. Sci. and Crop Sci., N. C. State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7609
A. Douglas Worsham
Affiliation:
Dep. Hortic. Sci. and Crop Sci., N. C. State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7609

Abstract

'Silver Xtra Sweet’, ‘How Sweet It Is', ‘Zenith’ and 'Sweetie 76’ were evaluated for response to 0, 35, and 70 g/ha nicosulfuron applied POST at the 5- to 6- or 7- to 8-leaf stages of growth. Nicosulfuron (35 g/ha) caused 60 to 80% visible injury to Silver Xtra Sweet. How Sweet It Is and Zenith were moderately tolerant (< 20% visible injury) and Sweetie 76 was the most tolerant (10% visible injury). All cultivars were less tolerant when nicosulfuron was applied at the 7- to 8-leaf than the 5- to 6-leaf stage. Plant height of Silver Xtra Sweet was reduced 51% by 35 g/ha nicosulfuron applied at the 5- to 6-leaf stage and injury increased when nicosulfuron was applied at the 7- to 8-leaf stage. Yield losses of Silver Xtra Sweet occurred as a result of the nicosulfuron treatments.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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