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Optimizing chloroacetamide application timing in dicamba-resistant cotton production systems for control of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 September 2021

John T. Buol
Affiliation:
Graduate Student, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA
Lucas X. Franca
Affiliation:
Graduate Student, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA
Darrin M. Dodds
Affiliation:
Professor and Extension Specialist, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA
J. Anthony Mills
Affiliation:
Weed Management Technology Development Representative, Bayer Corporation, Collierville, TN, USA
Janice L. DuBien
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, Department of Statistics, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA
Ashli E. Brown-Johnson
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology, and Plant Pathology, and Director, Mississippi State Chemical Laboratory, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA
David R. Shaw
Affiliation:
Professor and Vice President, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences and Office of Research and Economic Development, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA
Daniel B. Reynolds*
Affiliation:
Professor and Endowed Chair, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Daniel B. Reynolds, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University, 32 Creelman Street, Mississippi State, MS39762. (Email: dreynolds@pss.msstate.edu)

Abstract

A chloroacetamide herbicide by application timing factorial experiment was conducted in 2017 and 2018 in Mississippi to investigate chloroacetamide use in a dicamba-based Palmer amaranth management program in cotton production. Herbicides used were S-metolachlor or acetochlor, and application timings were preemergence, preemergence followed by (fb) early postemergence, preemergence fb late postemergence, early postemergence alone, late postemergence alone, and early postemergence fb late postemergence. Dicamba was included in all preemergence applications, and dicamba plus glyphosate was included with all postemergence applications. Differences in cotton and weed response due to chloroacetamide type were minimal, and cotton injury at 14 d after late postemergence application was less than 10% for all application timings. Late-season weed control was reduced up to 30% and 53% if chloroacetamide application occurred preemergence or late postemergence only, respectively. Late-season weed densities were minimized if multiple applications were used instead of a single application. Cotton height was reduced by up to 23% if a single application was made late postemergence relative to other application timings. Chloroacetamide application at any timing except preemergence alone minimized late-season weed biomass. Yield was maximized by any treatment involving multiple applications or early postemergence alone, whereas applications preemergence or late postemergence alone resulted in up to 56% and 27% yield losses, respectively. While no yield loss was reported by delaying the first of sequential applications until early postemergence, forgoing a preemergence application is not advisable given the multiple factors that may delay timely postemergence applications such as inclement weather.

Type
Research Article
Information
Weed Technology , Volume 35 , Issue 6 , December 2021 , pp. 1007 - 1013
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Weed Science Society of America

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Barry Brecke, University of Florida

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Optimizing chloroacetamide application timing in dicamba-resistant cotton production systems for control of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri)
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