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Methodology for Establishing Witchweed (Striga asiatica) in Research Plots

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Joel K. Ransom
Affiliation:
CIMMYT, P.O. Box 25171, Nairobi, Kenya
Robert E. Eplee
Affiliation:
Whiteville Methods Dev. Cent., USDA APHIS, Sci. Technol., P.O. Box 279, Whiteville, NC 28472
Marion A. Langston
Affiliation:
Whiteville Methods Dev. Cent., USDA APHIS, Sci. Technol., P.O. Box 279, Whiteville, NC 28472
Rebecca S. Norris
Affiliation:
Whiteville Methods Dev. Cent., USDA APHIS, Sci. Technol., P.O. Box 279, Whiteville, NC 28472

Abstract

Experiments were conducted in North Carolina and South Carolina, 1989, to evaluate methods of infesting research plots with witchweed. At both locations sowing witchweed (mixed with very fine sand) in or beneath the maize planting hole resulted in more rapid attachment of witchweed than other methods. Sowing witchweed only in the maize planting hole increased significantly witchweed attachment compared to the control late in the season at Evergreen, NC. At Dillon, SC, in fumigated soil, sowing witchweed seeds to the side of the maize row in a band or in planting holes or broadcasting and incorporating with a hoe increased witchweed attack. Broadcasting and raking was ineffective.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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