Hostname: page-component-7479d7b7d-pfhbr Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-14T08:06:39.090Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

A linuron-free weed management strategy for carrots

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 March 2019

Tessa de Boer
Affiliation:
Graduate Student, Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
Peter Smith
Affiliation:
Technician, Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
Kevin Chandler
Affiliation:
Technician, Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
Robert Nurse
Affiliation:
Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, Harrow, ON, Canada
Kristen Obeid
Affiliation:
Weed Management Specialist, Horticulture, Ontario Minister of Food, Agriculture, and Rural Affairs, Harrow, ON, Canada
Clarence Swanton*
Affiliation:
Professor, Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
*
*Author for correspondence: Clarence Swanton, Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1. (Email: cswanton@uoguelph.ca)

Abstract

The development of a linuron-free weed management strategy for carrot production is essential as a result of the herbicide reevaluation programs launched by the Pest Management Regulatory Agency in Canada for herbicides registered before 1995 and the discovery of linuron-resistant pigweed species in Ontario. Field trials were conducted in one of Ontario’s main carrot-growing regions on high organic soils in 2016 and 2017. Pigweed species seedlings were effectively controlled with PRE treatments of prometryn, pendimethalin, S-metolachlor, or glufosinate. POST treatments of pyroxasulfone and metribuzin followed by predetermined biologically effective dose (≥90% control of pigweed seedlings) of acifluorfen, oxyfluorfen, fluthiacet-methyl, and fomesafen achieved excellent crop selectivity and commercially acceptable pigweed species seedling control under field conditions. Carfentrazone-ethyl or fomesafen applied PRE severely reduced seedling emergence and yield in the wet growing season of 2017. This study demonstrated clearly that an alternative linuron-free strategy can be developed for carrots. The strategy of exploring the potential to use the biologically effective dose of selected herbicides to achieve crop selectivity and control of pigweed species seedlings was verified.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2019 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anonymous (2016) Aim® EC herbicide product label. Philadelphia, PA: FMC Corp. 21 pGoogle Scholar
Bell, CE, Boutwell, BE, Ogbuchiekwe, EJ, McGiffen, ME (2000) Weed control in carrots: the efficacy and economic value of linuron. HortScience 35:10891091CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bowyer, JR, Camilleri, P, Vermaas, WFJ (1991) Photosystem II and its interaction with herbicides. Pages 2786 in Baker NR, Percival MP, eds. Herbicides, Topics in Photosynthesis. Amsterdam: Elsevier.Google Scholar
Crespo, AM, MacRae, AW, Alves, C, Jacoby, TP, Kelly, RO (2013) Tomato root uptake of carfentrazone. Weed Technol 27:497501CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, G (2014) A Survey and Characterization of Linuron-Resistant Amaranthus spp. in Southern Ontario Carrot Production. M.Sc thesis. Guelph, ON, Canada: University of Guelph. 89 pGoogle Scholar
Dumont, M, Letarte, J, Tardif, FJ (2016) Identification of a psbA mutation (Valine219 to Isoleucine) in Powell amaranth (Amaranthus powellii) conferring resistance to linuron. Weed Sci 64:611CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heap, I (2018) The International Survey of Herbicide Resistant Weeds. http://www.weedscience.org/Summary/ResistByActive.aspx. Accessed: March 2, 2018Google Scholar
Jensen, KIN, Doohan, DJ, Specht, EG (2004) Response of processing carrot to metribuzin on mineral soils in Nova Scotia. Can J Plant Sci 84:669676CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kropff, MJ (1988) Modelling the effects of weed on crop production. Weed Res 28:465471CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ogbuchiekwe, EJ, McGiffen, ME Jr, Nunez, J, Fennimore, SA (2004) Tolerance of carrot to low- rate preemergent and postemergent herbicides. HortScience 39:291296CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[OMAFRA] Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (2010) Vegetable Production Recommendations 2010–2011. Publication 363. Toronto: Queen’s Printer for Ontario. Pp 9499Google Scholar
[OMAFRA] Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (2014) Vegetable Crop Protection Guide 2014–2015. Publication 838. Toronto: Queen’s Printer for Ontario. Pp 6167Google Scholar
[OMAFRA] Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (2015) Guide to Weed Control 2016–2017. Publication 75. Toronto: Queen’s Printer for Ontario. Pp 271275Google Scholar
[OMAFRA] Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (2018) Guide to Weed Control, Hort Crops. Publication 75b. Toronto: Queen’s Printer for Ontario. Pp 7581Google Scholar
Peachey, E, Doohan, D, Koch, T (2012) Selectivity of fomesafen based systems for preemergence weed control in cucurbit crops. Crop Prot 40:9191CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Swanton, CJ, O’Sullivan, J, Robinson, DE (2010) The critical weed-free period in carrot. Weed Sci 58:229233CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thompson, WM, Nissen, SJ (2002) Influence of shade and irrigation on the response of corn (Zea mays), soybean (Glycine max), and wheat (Triticum aestivum) to carfentrazone-ethyl. Weed Technol 16:314318CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Williams, MM II, Boydston, RA (2006) Volunteer potato interference in carrots. Weed Sci 54:9499CrossRefGoogle Scholar