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Influence of soil water content on growth and panicle production of fall panicum (Panicum dichotomiflorum)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 September 2022

Venkatanaga Shiva Datta Kumar Sharma Chiruvelli
Affiliation:
Graduate Student, University of Florida, Everglades Research and Education Center, Belle Glade, FL, USA
Hardev S. Sandhu
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, University of Florida, Everglades Research and Education Center, Belle Glade, FL, USA
Ron Cherry
Affiliation:
Professor, University of Florida, Everglades Research and Education Center, Belle Glade, FL, USA
D. Calvin Odero*
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, University of Florida, Everglades Research and Education Center, Belle Glade, FL, USA
*
Author for correspondence: D. Calvin Odero, Associate Professor, University of Florida, Everglades Research and Education Center, University of Florida, 3200 E Palm Beach Road, University of Florida, Everglades Research and Education Center, Belle Glade, FL, USA Belle Glade, FL 33430. Email: dcodero@ufl.edu

Abstract

Fall panicum is a problematic weed in cropping systems including rice in southern Florida. There is limited information on growth and reproductive ability of fall panicum in water-stressed environments. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of 12.5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% pot soil water content (SWC) levels on fall panicum growth and panicle branch production under greenhouse conditions. Fall panicum height, number of leaves, and tillers decreased over time as SWC decreased. Fall panicum height decreased by 65% and 50% at 12.5% and 25% SWC, respectively, relative to height achieved at 100% SWC. Plants at 50% to 100% SWC were able to achieve 50% tiller production within 31 to 43 d compared with 28 d at 25% SWC. The 50% tiller production was not reached at 12.5% SWC during the duration of the study. Fall panicum shoot and root biomass, total leaf area, and number of panicle branches per plant at 56 d after SWC treatment initiation decreased as SWC decreased. Fall panicum biomass decreased 83% to 85% and 66% to 68% at 12.5% and 25% SWC, respectively, relative to 100% SWC. Leaf area declined 79% and 65% at 12.5% and 25% SWC levels, respectively, compared to the 100% SWC. Fall panicum was able to produce panicles at all SWC levels, although the plant produced significantly fewer panicle branches as SWC decreased. Plants at 12.5% and 25% SWC produced 82% and 59% fewer panicle branches, respectively, compared with plants at 100% SWC. This study shows that SWC influences the growth and reproductive capacity of fall panicum. Although fall panicum did not reach its full growth potential at low SWC levels, it was able to survive and develop panicles, showing its ability to adapt and reproduce under dry conditions.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Weed Science Society of America

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Charles Geddes, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

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