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Herbicide programs for control of glyphosate-resistant canola (Brassica napus) in glyphosate-resistant soybean

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 January 2020

Allyson Mierau
Affiliation:
Graduate Student, Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
Moria E. Kurtenbach
Affiliation:
Research Assistant, Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
Eric N. Johnson
Affiliation:
Research Assistant, Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
Robert H. Gulden
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Jessica D. Weber
Affiliation:
General Manager, Western Applied Research Corporation, Scott, Saskatchewan, Canada
William E. May
Affiliation:
Crop Management Agronomist, Agriculture and Agrifood Canada, Indian Head, Saskatchewan, Canada
Christian J. Willenborg*
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
*
Author for correspondence: Christian J. Willenborg, Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaS7N 5A8. Email: chris.willenborg@usask.ca

Abstract

Glyphosate-resistant (GR) canola is a widely grown crop across western Canada and has quickly become a prolific volunteer weed. Glyphosate-resistant soybean is rapidly gaining acreage in western Canada. Thus, there is a need to evaluate herbicide options to manage volunteer GR canola in GR soybean crops. We conducted an experiment to evaluate the efficacy of various PRE and POST herbicides applied sequentially to volunteer GR canola and to evaluate soybean injury caused by these herbicides. Trials were conducted across Saskatchewan and Manitoba in 2014 and 2015. All treatments provided a range of suppression (>70%) to control (>80%) of volunteer canola. All treatments with the exception of the glyphosate-treated control reduced aboveground canola biomass by an average of 96%. As well, canola seed contamination was reduced from 36% to less than 5% when a PRE and POST herbicide were both used. Moreover, all combinations of herbicides used had excellent crop safety (<10%). All PRE and POST herbicide combinations provided better control of volunteer canola compared with the glyphosate-only control, but tribenuron followed by bentazon and tribenuron followed by imazamox plus bentazon provided solutions that were low cost, currently available (registered in western Canada), and had the potential to minimize development of herbicide resistance in other weeds.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2020

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Robert Nurse, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

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