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Competitive Abilities of Six Corn (Zea mays L.) Hybrids with Four Weed Control Practices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Garry Tyron Ford
Affiliation:
Dep. Plant Breed. and Soil, Crop, and Atmos. Sci., Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY 14850
Jane Mt. Pleasant
Affiliation:
Dep. Plant Breed. and Soil, Crop, and Atmos. Sci., Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY 14850

Abstract

Six corn hybrids were studied in field experiments in 1989 and 1990 to identify hybrids and corn plant characteristics that may be valuable in systems using reduced levels of weed control. Four weed control treatments (no-control, cultivation-only, band herbicide-plus-cultivation, and broadcast herbicide) represented main plots and maize hybrids were subplots. Medium-season hybrids with differences in height, early-season vigor, and leafiness were used. There were significant differences among hybrids in leaf angle, leaf width, leaf number, plant height, leaf area index (LAI), plant dry matter (DM) and grain and stover yields. Lower yielding hybrids had grain yields that ranged from 87 to 91% of the highest yielding hybrid. Aboveground corn characteristics were not correlated with weed numbers, weed cover, or weed biomass. A significant interaction between hybrid and weed control for grain yields was observed in 1989, suggesting that some hybrids are more competitive when weed pressure is high.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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